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Hi All,
I have been reading the postings on this Job Discussion section and really found very interesting and useful stuff. So I thought may be you could guide me with couple of questions I have.
I worked for company ABC for almost 2 year and got laid off. So when I started searching for new jobs I got an interview call from one of my dream companies XYZ and I did very well on the phone interview but messed up on-site Later I took up a temporary job and now that job is also about to end. So my questions are it advisable to
1) Contact my manager in company ABC
2) Contact the HR in my dream company XYZ. HR was very impressed by my phone interview then.
I will be very grateful if anyone can advise me what to do.
Thanks in advance
Priya.
[ December 16, 2003: Message edited by: Priya Arora ]
 
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There's no reason for you to not contact them if you would still like to work for them.
 
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Yes, contact them both.
BTW, when you mess up an interview, it's not the end of the world. Good managers know that some people don't work well in interviews. At one company a guy emailed us the next day saying "I didn't quite like some of the answers I gave in the interview, so here's a better answer..." and proceeded to write 3 pages on OO philosophy and some other stuff. If you screw up an answer or two, and within a day email them a better version, my guess is they'll look upon it positively because it shows 1) interest, 2) motivation, 3) and ability to find answers even when you don't know them off-hand.
--Mark
 
Priya Arora
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Thanks Tim for you great Suggestion!
Lots of thanks Mark for a very motivating suggestion. One main reason I was so apprehensive to contact them was that they might judged me based on my previous performance and might reject my application.
But what you have said is 100% true. Just because somebody did not perform well on that particular date does not imply anything, but you know, that courage to accept that "we can sometimes makes mistakes and it is ok to make mistakes" is very hard . So that�s why even I was contemplating whether to contact them or not. But I think now I know what to do
I will definitely keep in mind about your second point of following up the interviewer even if something goes wrong. That�s a really good point.
Priya
 
Tim Baker
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Originally posted by Priya Arora:

One main reason I was so apprehensive to contact them was that they might judged me based on my previous performance and might reject my application.


Well even if they reject you out of hand, who cares! You don't have to see them ever again and what have you lost? Depending on the process maybe a postage stamp and a couple phone calls?
 
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:
Yes, contact them both.
BTW, when you mess up an interview, it's not the end of the world. Good managers know that some people don't work well in interviews.


OTOH that doesn't always mean a thing.
I've had it myself, had an interview and while on the way there I got a phonecall that my mother was undergoing emergency surgery at that very time to save her life.
I told the interviewer that (and was of course not very well focussed on the interview and made a complete mess of it), they didn't take it into account at all (IMO they should have offered to postpone it, they didn't).
Guess they took it as being incapable of working under pressure (the rejection letter told something along those lines)...
 
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Guess they took it as being incapable of working under pressure (the rejection letter told something along those lines)...
Sometimes ppl reaches the position which they do not deserve, and than they take such stupid decisions. I believe Jeroen u are also victim of that. The fault lies in the person who is taking the interview. But sometimes we can't do anything(its simply bad luck). But thats not the case always, i believe that most of the time person(taking interview) are sensible enough to understand personal problem of the candidates. They may not recruit u but wont mind giving u another chance.
therefore I will say that Mark has given the right advice.
 
Priya Arora
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I agree with Prakash! I think in Jeroen's case those interviewers were a bit inhumane. I feel that they should have at least offered to postpone the interview because usually hiring managers understand if u explain them the problem
 
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:
Yes, contact them both.
BTW, when you mess up an interview, it's not the end of the world. Good managers know that some people don't work well in interviews. At one company a guy emailed us the next day saying "I didn't quite like some of the answers I gave in the interview, so here's a better answer..." and proceeded to write 3 pages on OO philosophy and some other stuff. If you screw up an answer or two, and within a day email them a better version, my guess is they'll look upon it positively because it shows 1) interest, 2) motivation, 3) and ability to find answers even when you don't know them off-hand.


Exactly. In Priya's specific case coming back would show two more things. First that he's persistent and second that he's really interested in working for this firm. Neither can possibly be a negative.....
 
Al Newman
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Originally posted by Jeroen Wenting:

OTOH that doesn't always mean a thing.
I've had it myself, had an interview and while on the way there I got a phonecall that my mother was undergoing emergency surgery at that very time to save her life.
I told the interviewer that (and was of course not very well focussed on the interview and made a complete mess of it), they didn't take it into account at all (IMO they should have offered to postpone it, they didn't).
Guess they took it as being incapable of working under pressure (the rejection letter told something along those lines)...


I had a similar situation. I was waiting for a call from the Netherlands for a phone interview when the phone rang. Picked up only to find that my mother was in the CCU with a heart attack about 1000 miles away. I called the recruiter I was working with to tell him where I'd be and drove to the airport and made the next flight out.
The client was very understanding. I did the phone interview several days later from my mother's house and they hired me.
 
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