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What happens to the CS Grads in US

 
Greenhorn
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People from india and china are still desperate to come and Study in the US through F1 visa, when the H1B and L1 Visas are not an option for them.
Most of the Universities in the US depend and expect to get their major business from the aspiring immigrants to educate themselves in the US. Thats how they make a lot of money.

What happens to all those tech Grads graduating from the univerities. Not every one is choosing MBA right. Ofcourse MBA might be a good option these days. The students are still considering Computer Science as an option. But is ComputerScience a branch they can opt for. Is it really worth it?
Will it produce the return on their investment???
Will they be able to get Jobs despite the fact that in the Next 5 years all of IT is going to be outsourced.
Please post your humble thoughts on this subject.
And have a wonderful time.
Samuel.
[ December 16, 2003: Message edited by: samuel kumar ]
 
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But what field of study is guaranteed to show return on investment? I don't know of any. My advice is to study something in which you are truly interested. Also, if possible, learn a trade that you can perform if you can't find a career in your field of study.
 
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Most 18yo's don't think about their careers. Too many people pick a major based on current interest. Instead, they should think about their career paths. For instance, in many fields, what you do at 24 is very different from what you do at 42. Most 18yo's barely understand what the 24yo's do, let alone the 42yo's.
Honestly, the successful people, in any profession, are the ones who quickly learn the job, what it's really about (not the field they studied in college). Networking helps, too.
As for an MBA, I strongly discourage most people from getting one. In most cases, it's not cost effective.
--Mark
 
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:
As for an MBA, I strongly discourage most people from getting one. In most cases, it's not cost effective.
--Mark


So, Mark, how do u think about the comaprison between MSCS and MSIT in the following thread? Since u discourage people about MBA, there is a need to decide between MSCS and MSIT(Management-related)
https://coderanch.com/t/28253/Jobs/careers/MSCS-or-MSIT
 
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If you must get a Master's degree, get the MBA. There's absolutely nothing I know of that warrants an MSCS or MSIT except as a stop on the way to a PhD, and a PhD in IT/CS is really only good if you intend to go into teaching future unemployed CIS grads or work in some sort of research facility where everyone else has one (or at least the "showcase" people do).
At least with an MBA, you have the ability to leverage it into a management position. An MSCS would tend to signal that you're too much into academics and not enough grounded in the "real world" (or so business likes to style itself).
[ December 18, 2003: Message edited by: Tim Holloway ]
[ December 18, 2003: Message edited by: Tim Holloway ]
 
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we have couple of phDs in computer science from some US universities like University of Maryland, Princeton uni, MIT etc they r friends of the CEO of our company and they r coporating with our company to develop some new networking technology written in C .
and my manager told me even if everyone's skill in our company adds up will still not match theirs.
one of them even has a MBA from uni of pennsilvania , so he has phD in compsci and MBA.
 
mister krabs
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:
As for an MBA, I strongly discourage most people from getting one. In most cases, it's not cost effective.
--Mark


Do you have anything to back that up? Most senior management positions in large firms require an MBA.
 
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What happens to CS grads?
Well, there are these crackers the government makes, to feed the unemployed.
They're called Soylent Green.
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Thomas Paul:

Do you have anything to back that up? Most senior management positions in large firms require an MBA.


Yes, math.
I would liken your example to sports or acting.

Mark: I don't recommend becomming an actor.
Thomas: But most movies from large sutdios pay actors excessive amounts of money.
Mark: But what about the tens of thousand of other actors who don't get lead roles in big movies, and support themselves through low-paid service indsutry jobs?

Do the math. For every Fortune 500 CEO with an MBA, I'll show you ten BU-level MBAs making $80k a year. For some people, an MBA will open doors, for others it just wastes time and money. If coming out of the MBA program, you'll be in the same career path, but making $20k more and with a slightly higher cap, you ahve to wonder whether it's worth the lost income and debt.
I'm willing to give up 2 years of a good salary and spend well over $100k to go to school. I think it will pay off for me. For other's that's not the case. For instance, MBAs are values on Wall St, but for my friends at Goldman, it's not worth it. They already make more than a starting MBA and are on good career tracks. They could get into a top school, but the numbers just don't work.
I think for most people, the numbers simply don't add up. It onus is actually on those who claim that it does pay off (since the norm is the status quo, which is not in school, you need to pro-actively change your path to be in school, so you need to justify the change). Consider the cost of applications, lost income, tuition, books, living, and social expenses for 2 years. Then look at average starting salary, and average salary in 10 years. Compare all that to your current careerpath and see which makes more sense. I think that for most people, the numbers don't work.
This doesn't mean that you ("you" refering to anyone) shouldn't do it. You should do what is right for you. I don't compare myself to all MBA students; I compare myself to top MBA students in entrepreneurship, because that is where I'll be competing.
--Mark
[ December 23, 2003: Message edited by: Mark Herschberg ]
 
Those are the largest trousers in the world! Especially when next to this ad:
Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
https://coderanch.com/wiki/718759/books/Building-World-Backyard-Paul-Wheaton
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