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Java Developer Pay Rates?

 
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A vice president of a company in New Jersey responded to my resume submittal, for a Java Developer position. I have been programming Java for over 3 years now. He asked me to give him an exact rate for salary expectations...
What should I put? Should I leave it as "negotiable - market rate"? I read somewhere that SCJP's pay rates go from $65 - 75K.
 
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65-75 is really high in New Jersey in this poor economy.
I appled for a job that was only offering 35k. When they asked what I wanted I said 40k and I never heard back from them.
When I had my prev job right before the economy went bust I was offered 60k.
I think you can find several resources on the internet that tell you how best to answer the question of desired salary.
I would advise giving your prev salary (doesn't have to be accurate they can't check) and asking for something along those lines.
Of course education level factors in. I have a BS. If you have an MS then that salary range might be more reasonable. Although I don't think MS is usually much more skilled than BS so it might not make a difference.
 
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Originally posted by Unnsse Khan:

What should I put? Should I leave it as "negotiable - market rate"? I read somewhere that SCJP's pay rates go from $65 - 75K.



I've never known any company to offer a full salary rate based on certifications. You're reversing causality, the SCJP doesn't yield that rate, but rather this is what other SCJPs get and the certification is one of many factors (and probably a small one).
Either put "negotiable," follow my advice here, or come up with a number and justification for it. Your salary should not be directly based off those of others.
--Mark
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Damien Howard:

I would advise giving your prev salary (doesn't have to be accurate they can't check) and asking for something along those lines.


I would advise against giving previous salary for reasons listed in the link in my post above.
I strongly advise against lying and would recommend that posters who suggest otherwise reconsider their advice.
--Mark
 
mister krabs
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:
I strongly advise against lying and would recommend that posters who suggest otherwise reconsider their advice.
--Mark


I agree with Mark. What would you do if they asked you to bring in pay stubs or W-2 forms as proof of prior salary? I had one company ask for those. Since I had not lied it was not a big deal to provide proof of my prior salary.
 
Unnsse Khan
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Mark,
Certifications do enable candidates to demand certain salary ranges.
Take a look at:
http://www.payscale.com/salary-survey/vid-3849/fid-6886
Take a look at this table:
http://certification.about.com/library/bl_sal03_salbycert.htm
The highest paid IT certification in the industry is the CCIE (Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert).
I would like to hear other people's comments regarding this subject matter.
Kindest regards,
 
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Unnsse,
A quite interesting table although not something that you could base much on. For example it has a SCJP in 2002 earning 63,292 and a SCJD only earning 59,000! Despite the fact that its the next level up. With this sort of table its useless if there are only a couple of respondents as one may earn 150,000 and the other 25,000 based on experience. I would imagine that only categories with at least 10 answers can even be looked at as being slightly realistic.
Out of interest is BrainBench really valued that much?
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Unnsse Khan:
Mark,
Certifications do enable candidates to demand certain salary ranges.


No. They don't.
(We'll ignore Sam's valid points about statistic analysis and pretend for the sake of argument that the data is meaningful.)
You are reverseing causality (are you familiar with that term?). You can only claim that the certificaion results in higher salary if you have two sufficently large sets of candidates, one group certified, the other not, but otherwise equal (in terms of educaiton, experience, personality, etc).
For example, suppose early on only the very smartest people took the test. In that case, you'd except their salaries to be higher. But the test didn't cause the higher salaries, it was their intelligence, which also caused them to take the test. That's a correlation, not a causal relationship.
I claim there are other factors far more responsible for those salaries than their certifications.
--Mark
 
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Hi,
I'm not sure where Damien H lived. In US, the HR will enter your SSN and your whole profile will come up. If you work in the secret clearance related industry, then the word CLASSSIFIED will come up. The HR will make a phone call to a company specialize in this kind of situation to get certain information that clearly not classified such as your previous salary.
If you are truely not remember your past salary, then enter a ballpark figure. Your SSN again will verify the figure, but save you from liar category.
Regards,
MCao
 
Matt Cao
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Originally posted by Damien Howard:
Of course education level factors in. I have a BS. If you have an MS then that salary range might be more reasonable. Although I don't think MS is usually much more skilled than BS so it might not make a difference.


Hi Damien,

Advanced degrees folks are the people running organizations and their skills are not greater than undergraduate folks. I think you happen to encounter people graduated with a degree of difficulties.
Regards,
MCao
 
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