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DeVry or "No Name State University"

 
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Here is a question for those of us in the U.S.:
Since I started working for a University recently, I've been thinking about the cost of education and the return people receive on their investment and it led me to a question. Why do people who wish to get into technology related careers chose schools like DeVry or ITT Technical Institute for their bachelors degree. They are pretty expensive from what I have seen (DeVry was 3 times the cost of the local State U in my city).
I guess my question is why pay the extra money? For top tier private schools, the reasons seem fairly obvious, the perception of a higher quality of education, a much more prestigious degree, a better social network. However, I don't believe these things apply to DeVry and ITT. For anyone who went to these schools, please do not take these questions as a criticism, I am just honestly interested in the answers. I really want to know if these folks considered state universities, and if so, what made them chose DeVry or ITT?
Jon
 
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I went to DeVry in Phoenix. There wasn't much of an alternate choice in the matter. I got an accelerated bachelors in Information Technology, meaning you needed a prior bachelors degree in whatever to get into the one year program, and graduated summa cum laude. I had never taken a programming/database course in my life prior to attending DeVry. I thought the coursework was challenging at times, as indicated by several students in my program deciding it wasn't worth the hassle of an accelerated program like this and calling it quits. Yes, it was expensive. I started in 10/2001 and it cost $20K. If I could do it over, hindsight being clearer, I would have chosen not to get my original bachelors from ASU, but from DeVry. Yes, it would have been ten time more expensive than a state school, but I would have had a four year degree in Computer Science, and definitely more classroom experience than at a state school.
However, I've noticed serveral community colleges lately, especially in the midwest, offering an Associates degree that nearly matches course for course and in the same order as the one I paid $20k for, at a fraction of the price. I didn't choose DeVry because I thought it was prestigious, and definitely not for the cost, rather I chose it because I liked the program and what it offered. At the time, none of the community colleges in the Phoenix metro offered what DeVry offered in a "hands-on" setting.
So far, my degree is only paying off in a personal satisfaction way rather than a monetary one. People who should go to DeVry are those who already work in a particular business that would have opportunities to advance into. What I lacked coming out of DeVry was business experience. More specifically, how businesses do business. I don't know the finance business, or the health care business or the banking business, etc. Those are the skills that I lack which I think are the barrier to getting a job.
I could go on, but I'll stop for now.
[ February 05, 2004: Message edited by: leo donahue ]
 
Jon McDonald
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Their unique accelerated courses, and the fact that a few years ago other universities and community colleges weren't offering similar coursework, are reasons that I hadn't thought of. Thanks for the info! I wonder, if state schools started offering similar programs, at a lower price, could it be a new source of revenue for them? Oh well, I'm just thinking out loud.
Thanks,
Jon
 
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Hi,
Yes, they do because teachers are pressures as much as us out in the real world. At least in California, the professors who teach those programme usually have industry experience and some work as industry consultants.
Regards,
MCao
 
leo donahue
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Originally posted by Jon McDonald:
Their unique accelerated courses, and the fact that a few years ago other universities and community colleges weren't offering similar coursework, are reasons that I hadn't thought of. Thanks for the info! I wonder, if state schools started offering similar programs, at a lower price, could it be a new source of revenue for them? Oh well, I'm just thinking out loud.
Thanks,
Jon


At DeVry, I had 12 courses at 4 credits each. Each course was approximately 7 and 1/2 weeks. I took two courses at a time for approximately 48 weeks and we had cummulative tests every week on top of weekly homework. I don't know if that sort of thing will fly at the state school level. Too much work for the multitude of student still trying to figure out what they want to do with their lives. And remember that not everyone will want or be able to go at that pace. Some will want to go slower and others much faster. That is why DeVry's nickname is called "Deep Fry High".
[ February 05, 2004: Message edited by: leo donahue ]
 
Matt Cao
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Hi,
Yes, they do because those programmes are operated on different level and schedule than the traditional ones. Students who enroll in such programme usually have jobs closely related to the field and want an extra-edge for today pierce competition. You may try that yourself Leo. Nothing beat classroom experience because people know your face, your name, and your capabilities. You alway could change course of action if you see the majority in the class are unemployed. Usually, you will find out on the first day introduction sort of breaking the ice between instructor and students. One of my programmer follow that route.
Regards,
MCao
 
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