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Microsoft Longhorn

 
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What do people think the implications of longhorns release will have on developers in 2/3 years time?
 
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Probably none if they are already used to Red HatMozilla.
I think, not sure.
Oops ! Check this
Countryman explained that legacy operating systems had reached their zenith with Internet Explorer 6, Service Pack 1, and that further improvements to the browser would require enhancements to the underlying operating system.
"Microsoft will not develop the stand-alone version of Internet Explorer further, instead going for full integration in the upcoming 'Longhorn' operating system to be released in a few years time," Opera said. "Internet Explorer users thus need to buy a new operating system to get a new browser. This leaves Opera as the only major commercial player continuing to push browser development, offering a vast number of new users a continually up-to-date and enhanced Internet experience."

Opera, Mozilla Release New Browser Betas
[ February 12, 2004: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
 
Robin Davies
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Sorry, i don't understand your point! Can you clarify your self please.
 
Robin Davies
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impact on developers???
 
HS Thomas
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By developers did you mean those interested in browser development ?
I realise not all developers are interested in browsers.
Those following the browser wars will be paying attention to what's happening with Longhorn. But it looks like the new O/S would be required as well!I am not sure what other goodies Longhorn has but upgrades of IE would have the first impact, I imagine.
More Linux and Opera users.
[ February 12, 2004: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
 
Robin Davies
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microsoft certified software developers, what impact will this have on them?
 
HS Thomas
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Personally I would be more interested in how Longhorn would affect road warriors and corporate employees than mcsd certified.
 
Robin Davies
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thanks for not answering my question
 
HS Thomas
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'Whidbey' Paving Path For Microsoft's Longhorn
HTH.
For those developers not interested in and never developed for M$ stuff, LongHorn is also a Texas Steak House.
 
Robin Davies
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how will this affect the demand for microsoft developers? that is my question! Not what longhorn is about, i know that. Thanks for trying to answer my question!
 
HS Thomas
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Well, I guess that would depend on improve time-to-market and whether there may be more interesting things in the pipeline by other vendors.
There was a post earlier on about a new kind of chip - fibre-optic lightning speeds at current high-street prices - that could have an impact on demand for Longhorn.Chip Breakthrough giving rise to new Virtual machines.
The Gates Empire looks as though it will continue for decades yet, IMHO, so I can't see demand dropping. They may be looking for new generations of MCSDs though.The link I gave above indicates that Whitdbey paves the way in being used to seed the developer community.
[ February 12, 2004: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
 
HS Thomas
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Having said that time-to-market isn't all -

The Netscape Story
For PC software, there�s a myth that design is unimportant because time-to-market is all that matters. Netscape�s demise is a story worth pondering in this respect.; Thee original NCSA Mosaic team at the University of Illinois built the first widely used browser, but they did a quick and dirty job. They founded Netscape, and between April and December 1994 built Navigator 1.0. It ran on 3 platforms, and soon became the dominant browser on Windows, Unix and Mac. Microsoft began developing Internet Explorer 1.0 in October 1994, and shipped it with Windows 95 in August 1995.
In Netscape�s rapid growth period, from 1995 to 1997, the developers worked hard to ship new products with new features, and gave little time to design. Most companies in the shrink-wrap software business (still) believe that design can be postponed: that once you have market share and a compelling feature set, you can �refactor� the code and obtain the benefits of clean design. Netscape was no exception, and its engineers were probably more talented than many.
Meanwhile, Microsoft had realized the need to build on solid designs. It built NT from scratch, and restructured the Office suite to use shared components. It did hurry to market with IE to catch up with Netscape, but then it took time to restructure IE 3.0. This restructuring of IE is now seen within Microsoft as the key decision that helped them close the gap with Netscape.
Netscape�s development just grew and grew. By Communicator 4.0, there were 120 developers (from 10 initially) and 3 million lines of code (up a factor of 30). Michael Toy, release manager, said: �We�re in a really bad situation � We should have stopped shipping this code a year ago.
It�s dead� This is like the rude awakening� We�re paying the price for going fast.�
Interestingly, the argument for modular design within Netscape in 1997 came from a desire to go back to developing in small teams. Without clean and simple interfaces, it�s impossible to divide up the work into parts that are independent of one another.
Netscape set aside 2 months to re-architect the browser, but it wasn�t long enough. So they decided to start again from scratch, with Communicator 6.0. But 6.0 was never completed, and its developers were reassigned to 4.0. The 5.0 version, Mozilla, was
made available as open source, but that didn�t help: nobody wanted to work on spaghetti code.
In the end, Microsoft won the browser war, and AOL acquired Netscape. Of course this is not the entire story of how Microsoft�s browser came to dominate Netscape�s. Microsoft�s business practices didn�t help Netscape. And platform independence was a big issue right from the start; Navigator ran on Windows, Mac and Unix from version 1.0, and Netscape worked hard to maintain as much platform independence in their code as possible. They even planned to go to a pure Java version (�Javagator�), and built a
lot of their own Java tools (because Sun�s tools weren�t ready). But in 1998 they gave up.Still, Communicator 4.0 contains about 1.2 million lines of Java.


I�ve excerpted this section from an excellent book about Netscape and its business and technical strategies. You can read the whole story there:
Michael A. Cusumano and David B. Yoffie. Competing on Internet Time: Lessons from Netscape and its Battle with Microsoft, Free Press, 1998. See especially Chapter 4,Design Strategy.
Note, by the way, that it took Netscape more than 2 years to discover the importance of design.
[ February 12, 2004: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
 
HS Thomas
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Robin,
What specific issues with the Longhorn release on developers were you concerned with ? Somebody else may be able to help.
(I just put in my 2p worth of what may, more likely not , concern me in the future.)
[ February 14, 2004: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
 
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