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Outsourcing HR Dept.

 
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Hi Rob,
Somehow, I always have the impression that you hate HR people, after reading the following link, I hope you will have a wicked smile today.
http://www.careerjournal.com/hrcenter/articles/20040218-weddle.html?home_whatsnew_major
Regards,
MCao
 
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Wow, and they say the tech sector is eating their own crap right now.
I really love the irony here, because it seems like what HR mostly does is act as a barrier more than anything else. I've often referred to the current environment as the "Revenge of HR" since I've experienced quite a lot of bitterness from HR folks who didn't like the huge signing bonuses that some tech workers got during the dotcom days. It seems pretty bad to act so petty towards people looking for work, a lot of whom DIDN'T get those nice bonuses during those days.
It's also good news for us, since the more white collar jobs that are threatened to be sent overseas or contracted into irrelevance will make it an even hotter issue.
 
Matt Cao
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Hi,
No. I think it will not changing much. US corporations are not making outsourcing move alone. But what I hope for the outcome of this year election, we will have more regulations regarding outsourcing.
Regards,
MCao
[ February 18, 2004: Message edited by: Matt Cao ]
 
Jason Cox
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I'm pretty much for the removal of tax shelters and government subsidaries for companies wanting to send work overseas. We don't need protectionism, just a level playing field.
I don't begrudge companies for sending work overseas, although I have only seen "cheaper" in a very few instances and "better quality" never. All the same, it doesn't seem right to send work overseas while accepting tax dollars that ultimately come from the very people they have decided are too expensive to employ, or to not pay their fair share of taxes to a country whose economy they are not directly contributing to.
Outsourcing will always be with us in some form though. It's not a new concept, it's been around for awhile. It's just the current fad. It will remain, it just won't continue at the same level it's at now.
What irks me is projects with poor quality being pushed out overseas where the total cost per worker ends up being the same or more than just hiring someone domestic. Smart outsourcing continues to be the exception, not the rule.
[ February 18, 2004: Message edited by: Rob Aught ]
 
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Originally posted by Rob Aught:
I'm pretty much for the removal of tax shelters and government subsidaries for companies wanting to send work overseas. We don't need protectionism, just a level playing field.

I wish I thought it was just misapplied incentives, but so far as I've heard, the primary impetus for offshoring hasn't been active government help. Protectionism is a questionable solution, IMHO, but I would like to see SOMETHING tilt the playing field back to a reasonable balance.

I don't begrudge companies for sending work overseas, although I have only seen "cheaper" in a very few instances and "better quality" never. All the same, it doesn't seem right to send work overseas while accepting tax dollars that ultimately come from the very people they have decided are too expensive to employ, or to not pay their fair share of taxes to a country whose economy they are not directly contributing to.
Outsourcing will always be with us in some form though. It's not a new concept, it's been around for awhile. It's just the current fad. It will remain, it just won't continue at the same level it's at now.
Last time it was a rush to domestic outsourcing. I'm sure in time another fad will come along. All I ask is a way to survive.

What irks me is projects with poor quality being pushed out overseas where the total cost per worker ends up being the same or more than just hiring someone domestic. Smart outsourcing continues to be the exception, not the rule.
[ February 18, 2004: Message edited by: Rob Aught ]


So many are quick to badmouth the quality of outsourced code and blame it solely on the lack of appropriate virtues of foreign workers. Well OF COURSE outsourced code is low-quality. I'm the only one in the world who can write really good code!
Seriously, when the whole purpose of offshoring is to get something for as close to nothing as possible, is it surprising that the offshore producers give you what you pay for? The less analysis, testing and review are done, the fewer expensive (even though less-expensive than US/Europe) person-hours are spent. They want to keep their profit margins up, too.
Besides, does Atul in Hyderabad really care about the quality of a project from a bunch of people he's never met and probably never will coming in in a stream of projects that are supposed to be moved out as quick as possible to be replaced by another equally faceless customer?
Heck, what with the perma-temping of America, it's hard enough to get in-house employees to buy into putting more work than absolutely required on a project. After all, they'll be gone in a year or so anyway. Often, even the CEO will have move on (of course, he'll have gotten paid a lot more in the process).
 
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Not due to outsourcing, but my sister (who works in HR) has in 5 years time had to reorganise her own job away three times...
 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
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