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Interview over lunch?

 
Greenhorn
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Hi,
I was called for an technical interview with a prospective employer.
It was supposed to be over the lunch.
Personally I am comformatable going for an interview in more formal setting so I directly told so.
Is it OK or will I be considered unprofessional?
Your opinions , suggestions are welcome.
 
Greenhorn
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Hello
Possibly your employer is very busy and interviewing over lunch saves their time.
Also people are more relaxed while they are enjoying good food.
Go for it.
 
Ranch Hand
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Hey but Radha already said NO, is that correct.........
 
Ranch Hand
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Read what Radha is saying properly,jyothi
 
Saloon Keeper
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I can't speak for Indian business etiquette. However, in the US, I'd rather meet over lunch than in the office.
First of all, it's a free lunch!
Secondly, it usually indicates a higher level of interest than what you'd get if you were just another person in a long line of interviewees. After all, the prospective employer is meeting outside the "fortress". Besides, a manager can interview in the office all day long, but probably only eats one lunch a day.
One of the absolutely best jobs I ever had I interviewed for at lunch. But I did learn you make a better impression if you select foods that you won't end up wearing on your shirt.
 
Ranch Hand
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Lunch interviews are OK, but watch what you eat. You want something non-messy which doesn't require much thought to manage. You're attention belongs elsewhere.
 
Ranch Hand
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Spagh Bol and garlic bread - out.
Alcohol - out, not even a tiny gin and tonic.
The most expensive items on the menu - out.

Well so what would you order ?
Spam.
 
Ranch Hand
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My knowledge of current Indian business etiquette is a bit rusty, but we have a number of possibilities here.
a) OP is a being interviewed for Senior to Very Senior role, and her manager want to make sure they will get along well (not just a geek typing away at her keyboard, with absolutely no world outside her cubicle)
b) Interviewer is too busy, hence arranges to meet over lunch (OP was invited through a personal networking contact etc)
c) Interviewer is a pervert and OP is a good-looking, young and single, Interviewer is trying to impress her.
Okay, last one is a bit over the top!
 
HS Thomas
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My last lunch interview was for a job with that .dot com that went bust
rather spectacularly. The interviewer was ex-army major (American).
Boo.com burnt through their �100 million war chest so quickly.
And all I ordered was a coke (sigh)
 
Ranch Hand
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I also gave one ... it was really messy as my interviewer was talking with the food in his mouth ... on the other hand I just ordered one coke
pheww real mess ... !!
but yes I was very much confused during the interview that who should be paying for my lunch bill (though only Rs. 10/-) ...
 
Ranch Hand
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Originally posted by HS Thomas:
Spagh Bol and garlic bread - out.
Alcohol - out, not even a tiny gin and tonic.
The most expensive items on the menu - out.
Well so what would you order ?
Spam.


Generally many companies have cafeteria nowadays.and they have standard food like North/South Indian etc.I will choose neutral food like sandwitch and juice so that interviewer won't know what I really like.
 
Tim Holloway
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Originally posted by HS Thomas:
Spagh Bol and garlic bread - out.
Alcohol - out, not even a tiny gin and tonic.
The most expensive items on the menu - out.

Well so what would you order ?
Spam.


It was Spaghetti and garlic bread. No alcohol, though.
I got the job anyway.
 
HS Thomas
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Etiquette :-
  • At the table, a woman's handbag should be placed where it won't trip the food server or other patrons -- at her feet, in her lap or under the chair.
  • Use price as a guideline in ordering. You want to appear gracious, not gluttonous. Look at the highest and lowest in the price brackets. Then go for the middle range.
  • Hands belong in your lap.
  • Don't rest your forearms on the table. And don't even think about having a cigarette.
  • The employer may suggest a drink or a cigarette as a test. Resist.
  • Show you trust others: Sample first, then season.
  • Don't salt and pepper until you've tasted your food. It could indicate you have a trust problem -- you don't trust the chef to season your food.
  • Talk the straight and narrow. Don't mix your professional life with your personal life.
  • Do not divulge information not related to the job at hand. This includes such topics as where you live, what kind of pets you have, anything that could reveal your age, and other personal information that may call to mind prejudices of the employer.
    Guilty of this at one of first ever interviews in a social setting.
  • Don't whine and dine.Stay away from negativity.
    This applies to the conversation as well as the food. If you ordered a hamburger well-done, for example, and it arrives rare, do not send it back.

  • This derails the lunch.
  • One recent change in social correctness is where to place the napkin when you get up during a meal. Traditionally, the napkin was placed on the chair -- a practice no longer considered hygienic, said Trenetta Robertson, certified etiquette consultant in Overland Park.
    Learn something new , everytime.
    "In our germ-conscious society, who wants to wipe their lips on a napkin that has been on a chair?" .
    Recommended is crumpling the napkin and laying it to the left of the plate, soiled side down, when you leave the table.
  • Modern conveniences and monetary considerations are two other important areas of correct comportment.
  • Leave cellular phones in the car. Turn pagers to vibrate.
  • If you must take a call, go to the lobby, where you won't disturb others.

  • (Unless it's a call of nature )
  • Tip as if you mean it.
  • If the maitre d' has provided a special service, such as a preferred table, tip with a $10 or $20 bill. For the server, tip between 15 percent and 20 percent of the service before tax. Substitute $ for the currency of where you are. Rs 10 or Rs 20 sound okay for the maitre d' ?

  • Manners are the traffic rules of life.You can't be successful without them.
    If your interviewer eats like a Hound, the best advice would be to imitate.[JOKE]
    Conducting business over lunch serves several purposes. If lunch is an invitation from a prospective employer, however, enjoying a good meal is not the intent. Usually.
    [ April 08, 2004: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
     
    Ranch Hand
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    Tipping is highly regional.
    Depending on the establishment, you may not want to tip at all over here in the Netherlands or tip a small amount only (5% at most is typical, most people just round the amount up to the next 5-10 Euro depending on the amount on the bill).
    Of course waiters here are paid a higher fixed salary than in some other countries and don't depend on tips to make a living (remember some establishments will collect all tips centrally and divide them up among all staff at the end of the day/week/month so the money you thought went to that nice waiter who helped you out when the cook messed up may go to the cook as well).
     
    Ranch Hand
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    Good lord, a veritable neurotic checklist of dos and donts.
    Might I suggest Wellbutrin SR or Paxil, possibly with a short half life
    benzodiazepine for acute OCD spells.
    Order what you want. If you feel hesitant about something expensive, just
    say that you want something on the menu and that you want to pay for it
    yourself because it's more than you'd want to impose on someone paying.
    I prefer to order something light off the menu.. For one, the less YOU have
    to eat the MORE you can talk. Let your interviewer enjoy eating and talk to
    them. After all, they want to hear about you.
    The other advantage to eating something light is that you wont have
    food coma.
    The prior etiquette checklist reads like an Prisoner's handbook in
    the concentration camp to avoid incurring wrath by the guards. Lighten
    up, please!
    -- Jim
     
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    Originally posted by Jim Doyle (Amherst MA):
    Good lord, a veritable neurotic checklist of dos and donts.
    ...
    Lighten up, please!


    I know you meant this in a lighthearted mood. Just to offer a perspective (not a chastisement), I think it was useful. Just last night I was at a seminar for the students I work with, given by etiquette expert, on networking. It covered basics like how to shake hands, giving business cards, not to eat and drink (you always need your right hand free), etc. To most of us in the workplace, it was "common sense" but to these kids, it was valuable information.
    You're right to break those rules, as do I. That's because they're not rules so much as guidelines and once you're comfortable with them, you can know when to break them. To someone fresh out of school, a clear set of "rules" is more useful.
    I think HS Thomas' post was useful. I think it's also useful to say that there are exceptions and experienced people know when and where to make them.

    --Mark
     
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