This week's book giveaway is in the Android forum.
We're giving away four copies of Head First Android and have David & Dawn Griffiths on-line!
See this thread for details.
Win a copy of Head First Android this week in the Android forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other Pie Elite all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Tim Cooke
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Paul Clapham
  • Ron McLeod
  • Liutauras Vilda
Sheriffs:
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Rob Spoor
  • Bear Bibeault
Saloon Keepers:
  • Jesse Silverman
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Piet Souris
  • Al Hobbs
  • salvin francis

Overall value of POJO work experience?

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 61
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This may sound like a silly question, since most work experience is good work experience. But lately all my contract work has been with POJO, and XML usually... doing back-end interfaces (usually to marry disparate IS systems together). There is often some Perl glue in there also.
However I'm rarely, if ever, doing any front-end stuff (Swing or Web-based) or J2EE (of which I have limited knowledge anyway, but enough that I'd like to move that way).
At the end of the day, does this POJO experience count for much? Or am I mistaken in thinking that most Java developers are web-based or J2EE developers?
Thanks.
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 264
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello,
First, we have a naming policy in javaranch. Please follow it. (In simple terms, state your first name and last name in your profile)
About POJOs, if i was hiring, i would love to hire a guy who is really good in doing POJOs. Thats object orientedness and good design. A framework such as J2EE is a standard way of doing stuff. Its NOT the only way of doing it. If one is good in design and OOD skills, a framework/API can be learnt.
In your resume, you might want to concentrate more on design and analysis. Try to get acquainted with J2EE stuff as well. Being good in OOD, you should feel comfortable as the degree of object orientedness in J2EE is quite high.
Cheers
Dushy
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 451
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Originally posted by R Hayes:

However I'm rarely, if ever, doing any front-end stuff (Swing or Web-based) or J2EE (of which I have limited knowledge anyway, but enough that I'd like to move that way).
At the end of the day, does this POJO experience count for much? Or am I mistaken in thinking that most Java developers are web-based or J2EE developers?


Hmm, it's a difficult question because we tend to see only part of the elephant as individuals. I'd say there is a definate trend away from EJB, particularly entity beans. The UI stuff remains reasonable, although servlets/JSP are losing ground to Struts and Webwork, and I suspect that Struts is going to lose ground to JSF now that the standard has been finalized.
I think there is a trend toward open-source tools, with stuff like Hibernate, Maven, JUnit, and Cruise Control becoming hot in the marketplace.
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 3404
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Originally posted by Don Stadler:


I think there is a trend toward open-source tools, with stuff like Hibernate, Maven, JUnit, and Cruise Control becoming hot in the marketplace.


And they'll call it J3EE.
I'd say CMP entity beans are in and BMP entity beans are out.
Tiger is not evoking a lot of excitement amongst developers . There may be value in not working with a language that looks too much like C#. - I dunno.
JMS - message beans are definitely in.
Rod Johnson , Juergen Hoeller and Cedric Beust seem to be voices of reason.
Well that's where I am stopping.

Ara's recipe for J3EE is:
"All the pieces of the puzzle are here:
- AOP support (AOP Alliance, and other AOP frameworks like JBoss')
- IoC support, oops I mean Dependency Injection (Spring, Pico, etc)
- Attributes for declarative programming (JSR 175, QDox, XDoclet)
- Lightweight configurable enterprise services (lightweight container services provided by Spring, persistence using Hibernate/JDO, ...)
And from J2EE just take all the good stuff, such as servlets, JTA, JCA, etc, and add them to the mix. This is my recipe for J3EE!"
[ April 30, 2004: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
 
B Hayes
Ranch Hand
Posts: 61
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Originally posted by Dushy Inguva:
Hello,
First, we have a naming policy in javaranch. Please follow it. (In simple terms, state your first name and last name in your profile)


My understanding is that an initial is allowed for a first name.
If that is not correct, the Naming Policy here should be corrected:
http://www.javaranch.com/name.jsp
..specifically: "You can even use initials for the first name if you like.
"
Thanks.
 
You showed up just in time for the waffles! And this tiny ad:
Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
https://coderanch.com/wiki/718759/books/Building-World-Backyard-Paul-Wheaton
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic