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Frequently Changing Job is worth while

 
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Hi Guys!!!
I want your suggestions that is it fine to change job so frequently i.e. with-in 2-3 months, as the one is getting better opportunity & package. Will it give any adverse affect to your resume or one should go for it.



Regards

Anurag
 
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well, i remember a few years ago. my cousin did exactly that - every time a new opportunity arose, he would leave his old company for a new, better paying job. this worked fine for a while, until...

the bubble burst. he was laid off at his job since he was the new guy. then he started looking. found he had priced himself out of the market. his asking salary was too high for the experience he had. and, he had really annoyed all those companies he left being - none would even talk to him about coming back.

Now, i'm not suggesting you NEVER leave a company after a few months - somtimes it's just not a good match between employer/employee. but 3 months hardly seems like enough time to find out, IMHO, unless there is some extreme extenuating circumstance.

How's that for no help at all???
 
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I'd say stay at least a year unless you are on a shortterm contract in which case it's OK not to renew it when it runs out.

I stayed 15 months at my first job, left because I could not accept the terms of the new contract the company that was taking over was offering and I had an offer that was good coming in.

Stayed 5 years at the second until that company went bankrupt.

Stayed 6 months at the third until the contract ran out. Would have stayed on but got a better offer at a more secure (that company was a startup, I didn't like the risk of them failing and me being on the street for the 2nd time in a year) company where I still am almost a year later and have no plans for leaving.

Any of them would hire me back (in fact I got an offer from my boss at the 2nd job who wanted to try to restart the company, I refused because I didn't trust the business plan).
 
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Originally posted by Anurag Mishra:
Hi Guys!!!
I want your suggestions that is it fine to change job so frequently i.e. with-in 2-3 months, as the one is getting better opportunity & package. Will it give any adverse affect to your resume or one should go for it.



Regards

Anurag



If your resume shows many job-hops every 3 months or so, and I were the hiring manager, I'd most likely drop you like a hot potato. Why? Because you are too big a risk for me; for all I know, after all the expense of interviewing, hiring, perhaps even some training, you will just leave after 2 or 3 months and then I'll be left high & dry & will have to go through this process all over again. In today's market, I as a hiring manager, can be very picky.
 
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Hey, I know the idea of corporate loyalty is dead in both directions, but still!

2-3 months on a job sounds like something more suited for an assembly line job than software development. I consider any project that can go from start to finish in 2-3 months as a small project. Hence, the implication is that you jump in the middle, muck it up a bit, then bail, leaving someone else to come along and either repeat the cycle or attempt to finish the job (preferably before the project gets killed and staff layoffs begin ).

Which, alas, does seem to be altogether too common.
 
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I concur with the above opinions. If you go to a company and it's a really bad fit, then it's ok to leave after 2-3 months--but this should be the one exception in 15-20 years.

The grass is always greener before you get to the other side.

--Mark
 
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More over if you are growing up in the organization ladder you need to adjust with your subordinates as well as your bosses. It takes quite some time atleast 6 months to 1 year. If you are going to change the company within 3 months how you are going to achieve it?
 
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I notice that some posts on this thread talk about full time employees and some posts talk about consultants.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but not renewing a consulting contract of whatever length is no problem for employer or consultant.

Full time employement usually has a probationary period, such as 3 months, where either side can decide for any reason that the whole thing was a bad idea. After the probationary period is up, leaving jobs after a few months can damage your resume and your reputation in the industry (managers change jobs and people know each other).

Of course, if there is a serious shortage of staff in your city, it won't matter now. Unfortunately, talent shortages are self-correcting and then you'll have a problem.
 
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Mike Gershman:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but not renewing a consulting contract of whatever length is no problem for employer or consultant.

It shouldn't be. Some employers, or rather some managers, don't fully understand the difference between contractors and employees, though.
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Mike Gershman:

Full time employement usually has a probationary period, such as 3 months, where either side can decide for any reason that the whole thing was a bad idea. After the probationary period is up, leaving jobs after a few months can damage your resume and your reputation in the industry (managers change jobs and people know each other).



Maybe. It depends.

In the US there usually isn't a probationary period per se, at least not as it's used in other countries. It's not uncommon, however, for benefits to not kick in for anywhere from 1-3 months (sometimes as much as 6 months).

Of course, 95% of It employee contracts are employee-at-will which means either side can terminate it without cause at any time. Personally, if I saw someone leave a job after 1 month, it would be a flag. If you find yourself in that position, I would just leave it off the resume altogether.

--Mark
 
Tim Holloway
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Down here, 4-6 weeks seems about average for the probation period.

I took a job - and had to move out of town to do it. Well within the 4 months, I realized it was was a horrible mistake. They were into "Management By Intimidation" and I don't intimidate. I called up the recruiter in the hops that he could find me something better, but his own obligations prevented it (and considering that this was in the heart of the late-80s recession, there probably was no place else to go anyway).

I ended up working there for another 18 months. I consider it the worst position I ever held. Every time I thought I was learning to live with it, they'd slam me again. For several years after I held onto my employee review sheets. They were full of the positive items I expect to see considering that I'm generally considered to be above-average for the profession. And then every last item had a "BUT" after it to negate it.

It paid the bills. Other than that, I wasn't sad to lose the job. So if someone came to me having quit a previous employer after only a month, I'd not neccesarily hold it against them.

A repeated history of doing so, however, would be another matter. Anyone who's that poor a fit in that many companies should either be in some other line of work, or their true line of work isn't in doing the work they're being hired for, because their "profession" is in jumping for opportunities, not in producing products.
 
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