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experience

 
Greenhorn
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I have been looking for a job for about six months. Have couple years experience, certifications, and a degree. The jobs I see require all these different technologies. I see some like: junior programmer, couple years experience, must have XML, servlets, JSP, ASP, SQL, as so on. Who learns all this in a couple of years? A junior programmer?

I thought the point of a degree is showing that you can learn new things quickly? Are other professions this picky? Or is it because a glut of tech people out there? You have to be proficient in everything to make 30 grand? Isn't most coding jobs just building on what they already have; learning enough to do the job is not going to take long. Don't companies realize that there is going to a learning curve no matter who you get?
 
Ugly Redneck
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Apply if you have 40% of what they ask. The guys advertising the positions are normally HR people who know big terms but nothing beyond that.

Where are you?
 
Jim Frank
Greenhorn
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Ohio.
Yea, that is a good point.

What got me is I went to an interview and the guy asked me if I had experience in SQL language. That takes about five minutes to learn!
[ June 16, 2004: Message edited by: Jim Frank ]
 
Ranch Hand
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SQL takes maybe 5 minutes to learn the basics, it can take years to master.
And then there's the miriad dialects to worry about.
 
Ranch Hand
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Originally posted by Jim Frank:
Ohio.
Yea, that is a good point.

What got me is I went to an interview and the guy asked me if I had experience in SQL language. That takes about five minutes to learn!

[ June 16, 2004: Message edited by: Jim Frank ]



Sure, after spending 5 minutes to learn SQL, you can then write an sql query that will run for 5 days and also crash the db server. :roll:

As JW pointed out, learning the basics of SQL may take 5 minutes; but mastering it to write efficient, complex queries is a whole nuther matter.
 
Ranch Hand
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As more than one headhunter told me, employers insist on this stuff because they can.

In the good old days, companies would hire and train. This created a few years' gap between salary and market value (employers are not set up to double salaries in one year), so many people changed jobs to cash in on their training and experience.

Now, employers don't want to invest in their new hires, and they don't have to.
 
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