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Is market saturated for newcommers ?

 
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Hi all !

I would like to have your opinion about the sensible skills one needs to have so as to be able to get a Java job in USA, considering sponsorship is needed of course.

Best regards.
 
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If sponorship is needd you'll be fighting an uphill battle.

That aside, you ned some technical expertise, *experience*, and good communication skills. Ideally, you should have some excellent networking skills to get you in the door.

--Mark
 
Eric Lemaitre
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Hi all !

Thanks for answering, Mark.

I understand the idea as it will be hard to get, but could someone illustrate concretely "uphill battle" ? I am not especially ingenuous, but highly skilled IT workers are in great demand everywhere so they should be wellcomed easily anywhere, wouldn't they ?

In my case I have 6 years of java (among my 13 years IT fields), speak and write english fluently, have fair networking skills (Cisco CCNA+CCDA, CCNP/CCDP on way, own lab at home with about 10 routers/switches & 2 PBXs).

I wouldn't qualify myself as "expert" because of the huge toll of techs one has to master about Java (JDK, JFC/Swing, JNDI, JDBC, JMS, JSP, Servlets, SML, UML, XSL, WS, HTML, J2EE, ANT, networking, multitasking, databases, ...), not including other emerging promising techs we should have to add soon (JDO, AOP, Struts, JSF, ...), so I consider being an expert on all these fields together is much delicate to assume. Let's say my main domain in Java is JDO (I work as support for a JDO vendor). I whish it could be enough for consideration ...

Appart from this, 7 certifications right now and very likely 3 more reacheable at least before year's end (A+, Net+, SCBCD), as a preparation before leaving of course.

Best regards.
 
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I think 'Networking' he is talking about is your contacts through which you can get in a company through sponsership in USA.
 
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ALL visa (H1B) for foreign IT workers in the US for 2004 were awarded by mid March.
Should tell you something about the competition you're facing.

Then yesterday the unemployment figures were published listing an 8.3% unemployment for programming class jobs among US workers, hardly an environment in which companies will look abroad unless it is for highly experienced highly specialised people with very broad knowledge (hmm, do I smell a contradiction here?).

Total employment in IT shrank by 160.000 jobs over the last 3 years in the US, while IT management positions increased by 60% to 240.000 or so.
That means that the number of programming and other real work jobs shrank by over 200.000 in 3 years.
All those people are your competitors (minus a percentage who gave up on IT and moved elsewhere), plus everyone who's still in university and will graduate over the coming year in a field they now wish they'd never chosen.
 
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