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it seems jsp has not too much relation with c/s?

 
Jeffrey Ye
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i recently borrow a book about java net program,which is describe in c/s
mode.

i am a jsp new be.

it seems one can write jsp without c/s net bachground.

is't true?
 
Bear Bibeault
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I don't know what "c/s" means, and I don't know what "is't" means.

Perhaps you should read this with regards to using real words so people know what you are talking about.
 
Jeffrey Ye
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c/s mean client/server;

it seems client/server mode has no relation with browser/server mode

so,whether a jsp programer don't need to have background of java network

development,such as ftp,smtp
 
Bear Bibeault
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Originally posted by Jeffrey Ye:
it seems client/server mode has no relation with browser/server mode


How is the browser not a client, and the server not a, well, server?

Understanding the HTTP protocol is a core knowledge necessary for successfully developing web applications.
 
ak pillai
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You do not have to know Socket/RMI programming but you need to understand the HTTP model. Get yourself a good Servlets/JSP book or article.


WEB is called the stateless client/server model where your browser is the client and server (servlet/jsp reside) respond to client request. The state is maintained between the client and the server using a sessionid.
 
Stefan Evans
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JSP/Servlet programming that runs through the browser is commonly referred to as "Thin-client"
As it applies to JSP, it basically means you only need the browser on the client end, and the server does the bulk of the work.

An alternative is "Fat-client", where a whole lot more logic and functionality gets lumped onto the client end. You normally need to install the client specifically.
A whole book on client/server computing will probably cover "Fat-client" programming. As you have intimated, that might not be so useful in a jsp application.
 
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