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Resign - Will one day be a big deal?

 
Joshua Halim
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I am about to submit my resignation letter next week (that will be a two weeks notice). The problem is my supervisor is off on Monday. So, it will be a day short of two weeks notice when I give him the notice on Tuesday. The company is small and has no employee handbook so far, and it is my understanding, the two weeks notice is a common professional courtesy for resignation.

I don't want to burn any bridges when I leave, so I am wondering whether that one day will matter.

Another option will be to give the resignation letter to HR or the big boss on Monday and ask him to keep it private until I tell my supervisor in person the next day. But, since it is a small company and close-knitted, I do not think it will be a good idea (make my supervisor not the first one to know).

Any opinion?
 
Mark Herschberg
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I think that should be fine. You're meeting the spirit of the practice. If, on the off chance, it's a problem, maybe also offer to spend a little time with the new guy when he's hired (e.g. give him a few hours at night the first week or two) as a sign of good faith. But I really doubt this will be an issue.

--Mark
 
Joshua Halim
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Thank's for the response Mark.

Things go well. 'Fortunately' my supervisor is 'an alcoholic'. He canceled his day off and came in today. Submitted my resignation letter (brief, thank's to your past posting), told him in person the reasons, and the response was professional. I told a few other people that I have worked with or have close relationship.

Hopefully I will be leaving without burning any bridges. Probably will need them sometime, at least for future references (hope not too soon).
 
Jeroen Wenting
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IMO 2 weeks is very short. Could be cultural, but here 1 month is considered the minimum and 2 months is customary in many companies.

As to a day making a difference, sometimes it does.
I've had one company where they made trouble when I submitted a resignation letter a few days into the month, they considered the period to be 2 full months from the date the letter is received (and not from the beginning of the month in which the letter is received).
I'd submitted my letter on the first working day of the month which wasn't the first day, HR tried to reason that that meant it would effectively mean 2 months from the first day of the NEXT month (my manager intervened and I could leave anyway on the planned day, another example why it always helps to talk to people in your own group first as he knew the reason I was leaving which was inactivity on the part of HR to give me a different project where I could use the skills I'd been originally hired for).
 
fred rosenberger
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In the U.S., two weeks is the customary amount of time for notice. It can vary a little based on a contract or some such, but that is more the exception than the rule.

Legally you are not required to give ANY notice (again, with that contract exception), althought this is considered a bad practice.
 
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