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Manager are SO DUMB

 
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How come technical managers get paid so well? They have half the smarts an average developer has (most of them I've known do). My technical manager is probably the dumbest person in the entire organization, she spends the whole day on MS Project and sending out emails. I don't see her creating any new business or doing anything that benefits our work/project but I'm pretty sure she is making twice what i make. I just don't get it. Maybe project management is the way to go.

:-(
 
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Originally posted by heath carlough:
How come technical managers get paid so well? They have half the smarts an average developer has (most of them I've known do). My technical manager is probably the dumbest person in the entire organization, she spends the whole day on MS Project and sending out emails. I don't see her creating any new business or doing anything that benefits our work/project but I'm pretty sure she is making twice what i make. I just don't get it. Maybe project management is the way to go.

:-(



Maybe "project management is the way to go"...

I have done it for a few years. Didn't do much with MS project, but spent tons of time with, MS word, visio, and of course, powerpoint. Not to mention, the tons and tons of meetings. After a few months, I really hated it !!

If you have the knack to be a manager, I say go for it. They do tend to make more... and many people thrive doing it... but IMO, the work is hard, and if you are not the type, you will hate the job.

Henry
 
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Problem with the area I am in (midwest)- people that become managers are picked because of their connections rather than their skills. After 10+ years of development I am pretty sure of this- because of my nationality and gender I will never be given a chance as a manager.


Sometimes I wonder if things are indeed better on the west coast or east coast - may be it is more of a level play ground there? I am just sick of managers wanting me to work for them because I am a bright person but not willing to let me become a manager!
 
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I believe a technical manager in a big company such as a telecommunication company is a very high position, that position has the authority to approve new IT projects to vendors etc.. and manages several projects at the same time by liasing with the PM.
The previous company I worked in the job positions structure in the IT department are like assistant engineer, Engineer, Senior Engineer, Assistant manager, Project Manager, Technical Manager, Director and Senior Vice President.
I would like to know job position structures with the IT department of some big companies any of u works in
 
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Sales guys never struck me as particularly bright. I always though most engineers were smarter then they were, and yet they make far more money... as well they should!

There are many skills used in different jobs. Engineers need to be technical and quantitative. Sales guys need to know how to get people to buy. Marketers need to be able to understand the customer and predict trends and find product placement. Accountants need to be methodical and anal. Executives need to be leaders. In short, intelligence is not the only, or even primary requirement for a job. I know some brilliant PhD's, but that doesn't mean I would make them the CEO of a biotech company, or even the leader of a research group. Think back to that programming wiz you met at some point in your career. They guy was brilliant to the point of scary, you know, the guy who you lock in a closet with a couple six packs of jolt and three days later he recoded the system core. Brilliant guy, but kinda wierd; doesn't community, doesn't work well with others, he'd scare your customers and event he CEO--should he be your manager just because his raq IQ is higher?

Now maybe your manager is an idiot, I never met her. But remember that compared to the sales team, you couldn't sell water to a dehydrated man in the desert. We each have our own skills and choose jobs appropriately.

--Mark
 
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:
Sales guys never struck me as particularly bright. I always though most engineers were smarter then they were, and yet they make far more money... as well they should!

There are many skills used in different jobs. Engineers need to be technical and quantitative. Sales guys need to know how to get people to buy. Marketers need to be able to understand the customer and predict trends and find product placement. Accountants need to be methodical and anal. Executives need to be leaders. In short, intelligence is not the only, or even primary requirement for a job. I know some brilliant PhD's, but that doesn't mean I would make them the CEO of a biotech company, or even the leader of a research group. Think back to that programming wiz you met at some point in your career. They guy was brilliant to the point of scary, you know, the guy who you lock in a closet with a couple six packs of jolt and three days later he recoded the system core. Brilliant guy, but kinda wierd; doesn't community, doesn't work well with others, he'd scare your customers and event he CEO--should he be your manager just because his raq IQ is higher?

Now maybe your manager is an idiot, I never met her. But remember that compared to the sales team, you couldn't sell water to a dehydrated man in the desert. We each have our own skills and choose jobs appropriately.

--Mark



As usuall aall sense!!!
But, though I wholeheartedly agree with thsi analyisis, I hav often seen far too many managers whodo not understand what the technical problems/limitations are and simply use MBS (management BullS***t) like "you should be positive and blah blah" with some prejudices that tech team is only giving incorrect estimates are whatever. Very difficult to respect and work with such managers. We had this *lady* whom our VP enginnering supported a lot, half the time time she wouldn't undersand what we were doing so was genrally skeptical and rest of he time she was plain unfair. Unfortunately, this lady got more support from higher management as compared to the other manager who was quite tecnically competent and knowledgable. Finally, this huyquit, lady also had to quit later when she had to handle everything. Obviously, with that sort of decisions from senior company management, the company is not doing too well either.
 
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Many lowlevel managers are people that were promoted to those positions to prevent them from doing any more harm in positions where real work is being done.
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Jeroen Wenting:
Many lowlevel managers are people that were promoted to those positions to prevent them from doing any more harm in positions where real work is being done.



I don't know how "many" there are, but it's certain non-zero. I will say that the people who work at those companies and for those managers, are the ones who aren't smart enough or capable enough to find jobs at better companies with better managers. ;-)

--Mark
 
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.
 
Henry Wong
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:
Sales guys never struck me as particularly bright. I always though most engineers were smarter then they were, and yet they make far more money... as well they should!

--Mark



Agreed... I still can't believe how many engineers ignore their sales counterparts, only dealing with them "when they have to". The sales force's conduit to the customers is bidirectional. Sure, the sales force has silly requests with unreasonable timeables, but they are the best way to set the expectations of the customer.

Henry
 
Jeroen Wenting
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:


I don't know how "many" there are, but it's certain non-zero. I will say that the people who work at those companies and for those managers, are the ones who aren't smart enough or capable enough to find jobs at better companies with better managers. ;-)

--Mark



No, they're the ones who are too smart to be promoted to management functions
 
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