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A beginer in EJB world, help!  RSS feed

 
Anonymous
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Hi all,
Please pass your views and comments.
1.I am an SCJP and now have been asked by my company to get ready for doing an EJB project. Point is that I know only java and just as much neededd in certification exam.
2. I believe we got to know a lot more such as ADVANCED JAVA CONCEPTS AS JDBC,NETWORK PROGRAMMING, RMI, JAVABEANS. Also I beleieve HTML, XML , JAVASCRIPT, UML skills would be necessary for an EJB project. Am I right here? What about servlets & JSP? Are they not there in an EJB project.
3.So far what I have done is begin with HTML which seems chalk and cheese.
4.I have found that Enterprise Java Beans by Monson & Haefel is the most favoured book.Also I have come to know that EJB specifications and tutorial on javsoft site is good. So once HTML is over I'll start working on this.
5. Now additionally I think I'll have to work on either of websphere/weblogic. Do I need to finsh with EJB specifications first before I start working on these?
6. It seems they require a lot of horsepower while I have a 64 Mb 200MHz PC with NT4 at home. Do I need more?
It's a bit too much to ask, but every word of all be preciuos to me.
Thanks in advance,
Vikram Chandra
(That's my full name)
 
George Brown
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hi vikram,
we have a naming policy here at JavaRanch, and unfortunately a single-letter last name doesn't cut it.
Please look at the JavaRanch naming policy for more info.
It's possible that your full name hasn't been registered yet, so you could try that.
 
Frank Carver
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OK, I'll try to answer your posts in the order you gave them.
1. Don't worry, just keep learning. I always find the best way to learn is by doing. Find a small project, and try doing it using these various technologies. Some will seem appropriate, some won't, but you'll have learnt lots as you did it. having passed SCJP should have given you enough grounding to be able to read and understand any of the JAVA API documents, so just go for it.
2. Rathet than getting hung up on what you may or may not need for "an EJB project", the first stage is to try and understand the requirements so you can choose which of these you need to learn. EJB does not particularly require any of the listed technologies. Some people use some or all of them together with EJB, but you first need to find out what sort of work you will be doing so you can focus on te most important ones first.
3. HTML is very useful to learn, but probably the least applicable to a pure EJB project.
4. I agree, this seems a reasonable way to learn about EJB. BUt without practical experience as you go along it will be a lot harder.
5. Again, it depends whet part of the work you will be doing. If you job will be to specify, architect, design and implement a complete multi-tier application then you will need to know a lot. If you are just writing some business processing beans to plug in to an EJB container you can probably start straight away with just a copy of a tutorial and the EJB spec for reference.
6. I'm sure you can run an EJB server on such a PC. I happily run the Resin WebServer/Servlet Container/EJB Container on a 233MHz PII with only 64MB on NT4. You will need to make sure that you shut down everything that you don't need, and keep a close eye on the "Task Manager" to try and prevent your JVM memory from being swapped out to disk. In particular don't expect to run Outlook or any big, fat IDEs at the same time as a server (so no Cafe, WebGain, Forte etc.) and think hard before running a major database on the same box. NT4 is very greedy with its RAM, and 64MB doesn't offer you much to play with.
I hope some of this was helpful.
 
Anonymous
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Hi,
Thanks Frank for your help.
This is first time I am replying here, so may be I am doing it twice; so please bear.
Regards,
Vikram Chandra
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