• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Junilu Lacar
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Bear Bibeault
Sheriffs:
  • Knute Snortum
  • Tim Cooke
  • Devaka Cooray
Saloon Keepers:
  • Ron McLeod
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Moores
  • Tim Holloway
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Piet Souris
  • Frits Walraven
  • Ganesh Patekar

Path to management ?

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 904
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello Ranchers,

I've got a question regarding the path to management for software
engineers (computer science), and hope you might be able to
give advice and if possible refeer to litterature/webpages ect.

Basicly im interested in climbing the management ladder, but im
not sure how I should approch the "challenge". I guess it would
be a good idea to get an MBA along the way - but ofcause it's stupid
to get it "to early".

What do you become ?

- Specialist
- Software Architect
- Project Manager

I guess it's pretty hard to make the transition from specialist to
line manager, but how about project manager? ok, you learn how to
manage a project - but how many project managers actually move on?

Advice, tips ect. are appriciated.

/Svend Rost
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 120
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey Svend,

My husband has just been offered a management job in a startup company. The way he went about things is that he did his MBA just 2 years of working. And, he stuck with the company he joined after MBA for good 6 years. The last 3 years he has been a Solutions Architect in the Pre-Sales area. So, absolutely no software development. As an Architect, he used to meet a lot of clients and one of them has offered him this job.

I think the key to his career growth is that he found a good company and stuck with it for a long time. As a result, when he wanted to move into other areas like pre-sales and architecture, they gradually did it when they had a requirement for a pre-sales guy.

Hopefully, you get some pointers here...

Sara
 
Sheriff
Posts: 6037
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Svend,

There are many ways to become a manager and there are many types of managers to become.

I'm not familiar with how you are using the terms you listed. In the companies I work for, Architects do the primary system design work, they are not typically managers. Project Managers are either managers running a group, or not the manager to whom people report but just someone who schedules other resources in something of a matrix reporting structure. I don't know what a specialist is.

To be a manager you should understand:
- the different roles on a team
- the software development process (ideally multiple ones and their strengths and weaknesses)
- how to hire, fire, and mentor people
- how to balance features, time, people, other resources, cost/budget, risk, logistics, etc
- how your project fits into the needs of the larger corporate organization
- how to relate to the other groups with whom you work
- other responsibilities specific to your job

--Mark
 
Svend Rost
Ranch Hand
Posts: 904
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for the replies.

@Sara:
Thanks for the pointers. If I should sum it up, your husband got his management
job through commitment and education.

@Mark:
Let me try to elaborate the meaning behind the "terms" I used.

You might say, that it's my simplistic view of different roles you can have
on a project, instead of being YAP (yet another programmer) you might
- be a specialist(expert) in an area (J2EE for example)
- architect, i.e. deal with design at a higher level of abstraction
- manage the project

I see the above, as paths you can choose as a software engineer.

Im aware of the fact, that there are many ways to becomming a manager.
Furthermore, I'm aware of the fact that there's no "bulletproof path" to
a managerial position - but I'd like to approach the "challence" in the
best possible way.

Thanks for the list. Showing an understanding of those areas will send a
signal to your boss that you are able to "manage". The things you list
sounds like things a project manager should be aware of:
- You need to know the different types of people you need to have.
- You need to balance time vs quality vs ressources
- You need to be able a part of the political game in the organization
- You need to plan/administrate a project.

As I see it, there are pros and cons with working to much as a project
manager (compared to, for example an architect)
+ You get experience with managerial issues
- You might loose touch with "software development"

As I see it, you need a portion of experience before you can tell other
people what they should do - ofcause I might be wrong with the above, as
im still a greenhorn in "the real world" as I'll graduate(CS) this summer and
I've only got 3 years of IT work experience.

/Svend Rost

Edit: @Mark.. you mention there are many types of managers. I think, that
the goal (with time) would be a position as a CIO or something similar..
[ February 07, 2006: Message edited by: Svend Rost ]
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 47
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Does part time MBA really counts??
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 102
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi..ranchers.
Who plays the role of requirement gathering of projects?who is responsible for that?what can I do to get such work profile after 2/3 yeras exp?
 
Svend Rost
Ranch Hand
Posts: 904
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
To Amir khan and s jain: Dont hijack this thread. Start a new one instead.
 
permaculture is giving a gift to your future self. After reading this tiny ad:
Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
https://coderanch.com/wiki/718759/books/Building-World-Backyard-Paul-Wheaton
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!