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Some Basic Questions to be solved!

 
SRN Kumar
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Hi all,
I have some basic questions in mind. I would like to be answered. Thanks for your time.
1. What are the number of connections to the database to be specified (or should be there) for a typical development, testing, and production environment. It is a J2EE application. Also consider, I am using an WebSphere Application server.
2. Why do we have to use two interfaces to interact with a server component in J2EE.
3. If we want to make a clone of an application server on another physical machine, how do we specify in this WSAS?
4. Can we hardcode the number of connections in our Entity Beans?
5. If an Enterprise application is running on WSAS, can a seperate client interact with any of the server process/component through only RMI protocol? Let the client is a bootstrap-client.

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-- Sai Ram
 
Kyle Brown
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By the way, this whole thread should probably be moved to the IBM Application Servers area...
Originally posted by SRN Kumar:
Hi all,
I have some basic questions in mind. I would like to be answered. Thanks for your time.
1. What are the number of connections to the database to be specified (or should be there) for a typical development, testing, and production environment. It is a J2EE application. Also consider, I am using an WebSphere Application server.

There is no good answer to that question. You can't specify a single number because every application is different. Read the redbook on performance tuning WebSphere (at http://www.redbooks.ibm.com) for some hints.

2. Why do we have to use two interfaces to interact with a server component in J2EE.

Do you mean why are there two interfaces for each EJB? Read Richard Monson-Haefel's book (Enterprise JavaBeans) and/or my book for an explanation as to how EJB's work. The short answer is that the Home is a factory and the Remote interface allows you to interact with the components, but you REALLY should read the books.

3. If we want to make a clone of an application server on another physical machine, how do we specify in this WSAS?

Read the product documentation. It's described there in excruciating detail. Also, read the IBM redbook on clustering and scaleability in WebSphere, which also describes the process.

4. Can we hardcode the number of connections in our Entity Beans?

No. You can't. Why would you want to?

5. If an Enterprise application is running on WSAS, can a seperate client interact with any of the server process/component through only RMI protocol? Let the client is a bootstrap-client.

Well, clients can use RMI-IIOP to talk to EJB's or HTTP to talk to Servlets (You can also build Web Services (SOAP over HTTP) for EJBs in WebSphere 4.0). What other protocols would you want to use, and why?
Sorry to be kind of abrupt, but you really need to do some more research here. Read the above referenced books and see if they don't answer your questions.
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Kyle Brown,
Author of Enterprise Java (tm) Programming with IBM Websphere
[This message has been edited by Kyle Brown (edited October 03, 2001).]
 
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