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J2EE vs. .Net

 
q yuan
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Can anyone share some insight about the future of J2EE vs. .Net? Looks like Microsoft is falling behind now, but how about the future?
 
Matthew X. Brown
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I wouldn't be able to answer this type of question: http://www.theserverside.com/discussion/thread.jsp?thread_id=4838
go to this link. Its got a good discussion on J2ee vs .net.
 
Prabhakar Goel
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Hey It is something very clear a decision and has been said a lot of time.
** If You Intend to write a code once and run it anywhere independent of Server Provider Or the Operating System than go For J2EE.
** What .Net Says is just Opposite that is write anywhere in any language and it can be Java as well(though i doubt it strongly) but deploy it only on Windows Servers.
So i think this Policy has lot to do with the future of .Net.
------------------
enJoy Life with Technology ;-)
 
Fei Ng
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Originally posted by Matthew Brown:
I wouldn't be able to answer this type of question: http://www.theserverside.com/discussion/thread.jsp?thread_id=4838
go to this link. Its got a good discussion on J2ee vs .net.

thanks for the link!! great reading!
 
GM Pecaocov
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Cross-platform (Java/J2EE) vs cross-language (.Net) and probably cross-platform in the future, is just the tip of the iceberg. It's really going to be a direct confrontational challenge to Sun coming from M$. Most probably M$ will find a legion of ways of eclipsing Sun's Java/J2EE foothold and headstart (like what M$ did to Netscape?! :d), and .Net is just the first of those volleys. IMHO, Java/J2EE vs .Net is a no contest, provided M$ doesn't resort again to its habitual ways (running into a lot of trouble again?!). For Sun, I think it's high time they turn on the heat in promoting Java/J2EE in any (ethical) means possible, for M$ is currently king of the desktop.
 
ruilin yang
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Does it somehow also dependent on how other operating systems compete with Windows ? If Windows major part of the market, then .net will have advantage. If Linux and other OS are adopted more and more in the market, then J2EE will be successful.
I like to hear more comments on this aspect
Ruilin
 
karl koch
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hi,
with java you have a great variety on libs, often free and high quality. i dont wanna see the mess you get when writting in different languages (what good reasons are there to do so)?.
also why should you go for one platform when you can gete them all ? maybe im a little negative on MS, but i realy think java provides better technologies.
k
 
Subrahmanyam Allamaraju
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An interesting discussion. Unfortunately, I find most of the Java developers somewhat defensive about Java, and focus on peripheral issues. I think some of the features of .NET are very interesting to look at.
Subbu
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Subrahmanyam Allamaraju
Author of Professional Java Server Programming J2EE 1.3 Edition
 
Stanley Tan
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I agree. I've worked on Visual Studio.NET a lot lately and I have to say that it's great. There are many nice language features in C# that Java lacks.
One thing to keep in mind is that developers have to target their end-users. Microsoft controls the desktop market and so in the future it would be easier to develop client-side applications for .NET than J2EE (remember the death of applets?)
Anyway, short-term I don't see any of the two emerging as purely dominant, which is of course a good thing.
 
shailesh sonavadekar
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this is the future of j2ee & sun's vision. I hope this helps.
Regarding Microsoft's various claims about .net & c# & the no. of language it supports etc. , we have to see in future. I think everybody is defensive about putting money in any technology if there is no roi. whether it is .net or j2ee. So , Subramaniyham , I feel All developers must be defensive. Not only java developers. same way ms developers must have learnt java.
Plus , Java is 6 years old & many applications are developed. Many big companies have put money & faith in java ( IBM , Macromedia , Oracle etc. ) . It also depends on how & when us economy resurrects . Recession round the world can take a beating in tech sector.
Correct me if I am wrong.
Shailesh.
 
Stanley Tan
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Originally posted by shailesh sonavadekar:
same way ms developers must have learnt java.

Well, you'd be surprised how similar C# and Java syntactically are. I think if you know one, moving to the other shouldn't be much of a problem.
And yes, everyone is defensive on both camps. But again, I think MS might have the upper hand on the client-side in this case as in the near future, computers will ship with the .NET platform and not the JRE. It wouldn't be too convient to tell your users to download 5 MB of runtime code when they already have the .NET platform installed. It's similar to: why use netscape when IE is already built in? To the average user, that's an easy choice.
 
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