• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

usefulness of J2EE  RSS feed

 
chandana sapparapu
Ranch Hand
Posts: 63
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi all,
The following notes is from a tutorial by sun.
My question is, if we have to copy the EAR file to the client, don't we lose the advantages of a thin client(as we have to update the ear file every time the ear file changes)? Why do we need an EAR file if we have the client jar which has the client stubs..
Thanks,
Chandana
Accessing a Remote Server
If the J2EE application client will reside on a different machine than the J2EE server, before executing runclient you must do the following:
Install the J2EE SDK on the remote client's machine. The SDK must be on the client's machine so that you can run its runclient script. You do not need to start the J2EE server on the client's machine.
Copy the EAR file to the remote client's machine.
Copy the client JAR stub file to the remote client's machine.
Set the APPCPATH environment variable to the name of the client JAR stub file.
Set the VMARGS environment variable to the following value:
-Dorg.omg.CORBA.ORBInitialHost=<remote-host>


For example, if the remote host were named murphy, you would set the VMARGS variable on a Windows machine as follows:
set VMARGS=-Dorg.omg.CORBA.ORBInitialHost=murphy

 
Chris Mathews
Ranch Hand
Posts: 2712
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You do not need the ear file on the client. You only need the home and remote interfaces for your ejbs on the client. Since it is a tutorial they are trying to keep things simple and save you the hassle of piecing together the client jars. In a real production environment you would only be copying the necessary interfaces and these jar(s) would be created during your project's build procedure.
 
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!