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Need help with Study order for learning J2EE  RSS feed

 
Janet Wilson
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Hi folks,
I need some help from the experienced J2EE developers out there. I am putting together a training plan to learn J2EE now that I've completed putting together something to learn J2SE. I am having a hard time deciding which order to study selected J2EE topics for my group. I want to provide everyone with a well-rounded overview of both the client-side and server-side topics, then we'll get into Websphere specific issues, etc.
So far, this was the order of topics I was going to cover.
1. General J2EE Overview
2. JavaBeans 101 using the BDK
3. EJB
4. HTML
5. Javascript
6. Servlets
7. JSP
8. JDBC
9. More EJB
10. JMS
11. JNDI
12. J2EE Patterns
Note: I did not cover beans, applets, or spend alot of time with Swing/AWT in my J2SE training plan, but I did cover JDBC.
Is this in the right order? Are there other topics I should cover for this 1st pass? As usual, all assistance is greatly appreciated!
Janet
 
Chris Mathews
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Just a few notes:
You definitely need to move JNDI up the list since it is essential to many other J2EE technologies. The same goes for JDBC. I would also say that you should probably introduce Servlets and JSP before EJB since they are generally considered easier to learn.
HTML and Javascript seem out of place in this list. If you feel the developers need this background knowledge then so be it. However, I would combine the two in a single topic.
I would also probably drop the JavaBean topic completely in favor of a basic Java introduction as a refresher.
My list would look like this:
1. Basic Java Introduction
2. HTML and Javascript
3. General J2EE Overview
4. JDBC
5. Servlets
6. JSP
7. JNDI
8. EJB
9. JMS
10. More EJB
11. Design Patterns
12. J2EE Patterns
 
Chris Mathews
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You might also want to include something on J2EE Packaging and Deployment since this tends to be a tough subject for most people just starting out.
 
Manjunath Subramanian
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I would have added RMI at no 4 to Chris's List, since J2EE is predominantly a distributed architecture.
Wishing you all the best
Manjunath
 
Chris Mathews
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I agree, an overview of RMI would be helpful for those just starting EJB. Good suggestion Manjunath.
 
Simon Brown
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And perhaps move JDBC down a little, underneath servlets and JSP (I think they're easier/quicker to learn).
Simon
 
Janet Wilson
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Wow - thanks for the responses from Chris, Manjunath and Simon - I appreciate it.
Of course, I have more questions, perhaps somewhat directed to Chris, but open to everyone's opinions....
1. If I want to give the somewhat "well-rounded tour (showing client and server side)" of J2EE for developers for the purpose of giving them the opportunity to decide which "side" they would like to pursue further training on, then would it make sense to include the HTML & Javascript since I did not cover this when I developed my J2SE plan? Isn't this sort of essential to understand/appreciate servlets and JSP? Is there something better?
2. Is there a good reference you would recommend for reviewing the packaging and deployment? I was figuring on covering this somewhat along the way using deploytool and Ant but I am a beginner myself (we don't have anyone on staff with the knowledge, but at least I have done some training development) so am I missing something?
3. Ok, so here is Chris' list:
1. Basic Java Introduction
2. HTML and Javascript
3. General J2EE Overview
4. JDBC
5. Servlets
6. JSP
7. JNDI
8. EJB
9. JMS
10. More EJB
11. Design Patterns
12. J2EE Patterns
And, now my questions....
a) What kind of basic java introduction? We're moving directly from the J2SE training plan into this one. Therefore, could this be dropped?
b) If I move JDBC to immediately after Servlets and JSP, where would I want to cover RMI? At the same time as JDBC or before the servlets/JSP?
As usual - thanks for ANY assistance with this!
Janet
 
Christian Ebage
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b) If I move JDBC to immediately after Servlets and JSP, where would I want to cover RMI? At the same time as JDBC or before the servlets/JSP?
You could place both RMI and JNDI at number 7, since they are important for the understanding
of EJB.
Ebage
SCJP
SCEA
[ January 14, 2003: Message edited by: Christian Ebage ]
 
Janet Wilson
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Thanks for your help Christian.
Anyone else?
Janet
 
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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I teach an advanced Java class. I teach JDBC before servlets and JSPs because JDBC is very simple and gets students into the mind of how interfaces work in the real world. And , of course, you don't need servlets or JSPs to use JDBC. I cover RMI before EJB. I usually talk about RMI covering the problems and issues with using it and then lead into EJBs as a better solution.
 
Janet Wilson
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Thomas - I appreciate your response. Being an experienced instructor, did you find I was grossly missing any areas I should cover on my whirlwind tour of J2EE?
Thanks! Janet
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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