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what is "equal opportunity employer" ?

 
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i have seen some companies write this "equal opportunity employer".

what does it mean ?

i dont understand it.

can somebody please explain ?

thanks
 
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It means they won't care about your color of skin,hairs on your body,whether you have stunning looks or look ugly,whether you go to mosque or church.
 
alfred jones
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wow...employer should be like that.

is there really some employer exists who judges those criterias you mentioned!!!
 
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All have equal chances of getting fired .
 
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Back in the mid 20th century in the US, racial discrimination was widespread. non-whites had trouble geeting jobs, mortgages, etc. The civil rights movements erradicated much of the discrimination (although sadly not all).

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination in hiring, promotion, discharge, pay, fringe benefits, job training, classification, referral, and other aspects of employment, on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin.

This law is enforced by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)., and if a candidate feels s/he is facing discrimination in the workplace, a complain should be filed with the EEOC.

--Mark
 
alfred jones
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thanks mark...thats a nice info.
 
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Originally posted by Bana Shankari:
It means they won't care about your color of skin,hairs on your body,whether you have stunning looks or look ugly,whether you go to mosque or church.



In reality though it means they care a lot and will hire someone who's female, non-caucasian, or preferably both over someone who's a caucasian male.

It shouldn't be that way but a lot of the time that's how it works out.

And of course looks often do matter (whether male or female) in the hiring process.
I'm pretty certain I've been passed over for more than a few jobs because I'm no model for an airline recruitment poster or commercial for a sporting event.
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Jeroen T Wenting:

In reality though it means they care a lot and will hire someone who's female, non-caucasian, or preferably both over someone who's a caucasian male.



I have not seen evidence of that. There are affirmative action programs, in which schools, employers, government, etc actively tries to give preference, given a set of qualified candidates, to the ones who have traditionally struggled in that role, e.g. african americans in med school, women in executive roles. Such programs are, AFAIK, always made public. by and large however, I have not known it to be widesprad to the point that there is widespread discrimination against while males. If you can provide evidence from a reliable source, please do so.

Originally posted by Jeroen T Wenting:

I'm pretty certain I've been passed over for more than a few jobs because I'm no model for an airline recruitment poster or commercial for a sporting event.



Is this sour grapes or can you demonstrate that this was the reason (as opposed to reasons like intelligence, experience, attitude, teamwork, leadership, level of effort, etc)? if the latter, why didn;t you file a complaint with the EEOC?

--Mark
 
alfred jones
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this EEOC works only for US ? or for all over the globe.
suppose,

(1)an US IT company who has a branch in india , does it come under EEOC ?
(2) an purely indian IT company , does it come under EEOC ?


but you know, getting the evidence is hard....i am just telling you an example,..some IT companies prefer ladies(in fact , they directly tell we will hire female:male 70:30....one of my friend told his experience in a campus interview)....and they select more pretty ladies !

so female and look is dominating here not the talent!

this is a biasness ....the hiring guys are forgetting that they are recruited by the company to hire the talent and the best....not to be biased....but who listens!....they company suffers.....ultimately the company has to be stand and competetive in the market and nobody is coming to buy your buggy products.


and another case is, one can not provide the hard core evidence as well....because the interviewer will ask some tough questions(if he want to disqualify you ) that you wont be able to answer and so you are practically disqualified.


this thing are there in the industry...yes....but those companies who follows these things....believe me....they can not survive long time in this competetive world....and the hiring guys are the first to be sacked for the failure of any project or product....i dont know whether hiring guys are fired in any company becaoz of failure of project....but that should be done.
 
Jeroen T Wenting
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The police here had a policy to only hire blacks, preferably black women.
Whites were rejected even if there were no blacks matching the job requirements (they'd just skip the educational requirements for example to hire them anyway).
All this under the guise of "equal opportunities" and "creating a diverse force" or "getting a racial mix reflecting society" (despite the police at some point being 80% black in communities which were 10% black.
This was never published, until someone on the inside went public over it.

Is it widespread? Maybe not officially.
But with laws in place dictating that companies hire x% blacks, y% Asians, z% women, etc. etc. with subsidies for hiring them and penalties for hiring white males, it often seems that way.

Of course it's impossible to prove I was passed over because of my physique, noone will ever tell you so (except when you apply for the armed forces or flight attendant jobs ).
But if you pass a phone interview with flying colours yet after talking with someone in person (whom you had on the phone the day before and he was highly interested) for 10 minutes and suddenly he "doesn't think you'd fit in our team" or some other excuse there's little other real reason they can have (especially if you're both dressed in the common business uniform of suit, tie, and atache case).
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by alfred jones:
this EEOC works only for US ? or for all over the globe.
suppose,



Good question. I am not a lawyer, but here is my guess. The EEOC was set up to protect the rights of US citizens who are protected by htese laws. It definately applies to US citizens hired in the US by any firm within US borders. Likewise it applies to non-US citizens legally in the US and hired by companies within US borders. It would probably also apply to US citizens hired by US firms overseas. I don't think it applies directly to a foreign national hired by a US firm overseas; however, if that company was found to discriminate it could have indirect reproductions for the company if other people who are covered by US laws make complaints.

--Mark
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Jeroen T Wenting:
The police here had a policy to only hire blacks, preferably black women.

...

Of course it's impossible to prove I was passed over because of my physique, noone will ever tell you so (except when you apply for the armed forces or flight attendant jobs ).



So the answer to my question is no, you don't have any proof since you can't site any reputable sources and instead are just making excuses. The reason I'm singling you out here is because alfred jones asked a legitimate question and people on this site are trying to help him. He might think from your posting that discrimination is widespread and keeping you down, not realize that you just have a bad attitude about this. If you want to whine and bitch on this site, that's fine, but when you give people the wrong impression because of negative views, it mislead them, and that's not what this site is about.

--Mark
 
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Originally posted by Jeroen T Wenting:

But if you pass a phone interview with flying colours yet after talking with someone in person (whom you had on the phone the day before and he was highly interested) for 10 minutes and suddenly he "doesn't think you'd fit in our team" or some other excuse there's little other real reason they can have (especially if you're both dressed in the common business uniform of suit, tie, and atache case).



Quite to the contrary, there are a lot of indicators that are only available in a face to face interview: body language, mimic - even smell. And perhaps your tie had the wrong color...

I'm not even sure how you come to your conclusion - they knew during the phone interview that you are a white male, didn't they?
 
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:
Is this sour grapes or can you demonstrate that this was the reason (as opposed to reasons like intelligence, experience, attitude, teamwork, leadership, level of effort, etc)? if the latter, why didn;t you file a complaint with the EEOC?

--Mark



Probably not common, but it happens sometimes. My husband, who is Brazilian, applied for a job to teach math and science in Spanish (He is polylingual). He made an appointment for a face to face. He went to the interview, and they said, "The job has been filled by a Mr. de Queiroz". He said, "I am Mr. de Queiroz". They looked shocked (He is blond) and said, "But we need someone Hispanic". He had qualifications, but didn't look like a Mexican, so he didn't get the job.
 
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The police here had a policy...


Without knowing what here is, there is no point whatsoever to consider this point any further. Even if we knew where here is, the question is about what an "equal opportunity employer" is, to which there is an objective answer, which has been made well my Mark. Someones personal experience -possibly obtained in a different job market (we do not know), and possibly unrelated to the question at hand- has no bearing on this.
[ July 08, 2006: Message edited by: Ulf Dittmer ]
 
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Surprisingly, as a person of Indian origin and a permanent resident of USA, I have had quite a bit of bad experiences (maybe, you can say discrimination) from Indian based companies in USA. I have not experienced any discrimination, so far, from local companies who seem to go more by the book. Around 4 years ago, when I was looking to switch, I remember this consulting company which was about to place me in a client site that I wanted to work at because of its proximity. All things were set when the recruiter called me and asked me (without asking about my current status) to send my documents so that they could do a H1 transfer. When I told him that I was a permanent resident, there was an uncomfortable silence for a few seconds and a "I will get back to you soon". He never called back. I knew the client well and last year when I enquired, the manager told me that the company had told them that I was unavailable and had submitted another resume and who was selected. That other person was my friend and a H1B holder. Can I prove discrimination here? It's so tough and so subtle if one is looking for hard evidence. There were some other such incidents too and I stopped contacting these companies. Honestly, I do not how widespread this is as my experiences were from 4 years back when I was actively looking to switch. In my 12 years here in USA, I never had any problems with local companies that I applied for or worked for. They were direct (after an interview, "Sorry, you have a good skillset but we are looking for such and such...but you have such and such...",etc).
 
alfred jones
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i am sharing a bitter exp of an interview of mine...

the interviewer asked whether i am of the same origin and belong to the same place or not.....this was his first question.....and after that he asked 2 technical questions as if for formality and then told me that "i'll be get back soon"...and i was moved out....i am not giving any excuse at all...but i did not like this type question...but again you can not argue!

BTW,one thing i would do if i take any interview in future..

(1)never ask the candidates origin,language etc etc.
(2)never ask the current salary/expected salary of the candidate in technical interview...let him discuss that with HR folks!!...your job is to find whether a candidate is suitable or not.

but still,some tech-interviewer asks current CTC/expected CTC....i dislike this question from a technical person..........How do u feel ? what do u think ?



I felt very bad....that this thing exists in the industry...if i become an interviewer in future i'll stress upon quality....no biasness at all.....i just dont understand why some people get biased with gender,origin,place etc..but still i believe that there are only few companies who have narrow minded people sitting around the table.

i know a person who is physically handicaped and bad looking ....but he was really good in knowledge and quality....unfortunately he was getting trouble to get a job....though finally he succeeded and got placed in a big MNC....the smaller companies have the narrow attitude probabily.

anyway,Thanks for sharing your experience.
 
Ulf Dittmer
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but still,some tech-interviewer asks current CTC/expected CTC....i dislike this question from a technical person..........How do u feel ? what do u think ?


There may be several positions demanding different skill sets, and earning different salaries. Knowing what the applicant has in mind makes it easier to match an applicant with available positions. Furthermore, if the applicant is way off base with his expected salary, I can spare everyone else in the company pointless further interview rounds.
 
Jeroen T Wenting
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(1)never ask the candidates origin,language etc etc.
(2)never ask the current salary/expected salary of the candidate in technical interview...let him discuss that with HR folks!!...your job is to find whether a candidate is suitable or not.



The first is actually illegal in the Netherlands and many other countries (though asking about your fluency in languages used in the company is allowed and appropriate).
The second can give you some indication of whether the applicant would accept a potential offer. If you have $3000 to offer and they expect at least double that what's the use of going to the second stage? Waste of time for both parties, best get that expectation matched with reality at the outset and part as friends after 10 minutes than spend days or weeks of interviews back and forth before you find out there can be no agreement.
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by alfred jones:

(1)never ask the candidates origin,language etc etc.
(2)never ask the current salary/expected salary of the candidate in technical interview...let him discuss that with HR folks!!...your job is to find whether a candidate is suitable or not.

but still,some tech-interviewer asks current CTC/expected CTC....i dislike this question from a technical person..........How do u feel ? what do u think ?



In the US asking about country of origin is illegal. Asking about language skills is not (I don't where exactly the line is drawn about asking native tounges).

I'm not sure what CTC stands for, but I'm interpreting it to be compensation/salary. it's certainly a fair question to be asked and it may be a technical person who asks, depending on company policy. (It could also be some other developer trying to learn what the market is like and if he is being well compensated.) I would encourage you to be careful about how you respond to this question.

--Mark
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Anand Prabhu:
Surprisingly, as a person of Indian origin and a permanent resident of USA, I have had quite a bit of bad experiences (maybe, you can say discrimination)...



This sounds illegal to me. If it bothers you, I would call the EEOC and talk to them about options.

--Mark
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