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interesting interview with Rod Johnson  RSS feed

 
Axel Janssen
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I like his book.
interview
 
Kyle Brown
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He's dead on about a few things (.NET and the Java Pet Store, for instance) but from the interview it appears he's pretty clueless about the value and scope of patterns.
When he makes statements like
I'm a bit skeptical about the "J2EE Patterns" bandwagon. True design patterns should be applicable across different languages, such as C++, Java or Smalltalk. They shouldn't be tied to a particular technology, such as EJB.

He's really showing his ignorance of the breadth and scope of the J2EE patterns literature and of where the J2EE patterns came from. It seems like he might have read Floyd Marinescu's book, and he refers to "Core J2EE patterns", but I fail to see how he could think that the J2EE patterns in "Core J2EE patterns" could fail to apply (in the same form) to any distributed object system. I mean, after all, that IS what Martin Fowler clearly demonstrated in his latest book "Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture", where he takes a lot of the same patterns that are in "Core J2EE patterns" and then provides implementations in .NET and C#.
Good grief, even if you go back to some of the earliest discussions of these patterns (like my paper from PLoP 99 for gosh sakes) you'll see that the notions of "Session Facades", "Value Objects" and "Value Object Assembler" were actually originally derived from experiences with CORBA and (in my case and Martin Fowler's case) Gemstone for Smalltalk!
Then there's this quote:
My advice to developers is: read the Gang of Four patterns book from cover to cover at least once a year. This contains 90% of what you need to know about patterns and is guaranteed to make you a better OO programmer every time you read it.

Good night, the GOF book is NOT holy scripture. I should know -- I wrote the very first published design patterns experience report (Experiencing patterns at the design level, Object Magazine, January 1996) and also wrote the very first book ABOUT the GOF patterns (The Design Patterns Smalltalk Companion, which started the little cottage industry of books that "interpret" the GOF book). There's no reason to read the GOF book every year, and certainly not cover to cover -- that'll do nothing but cure insomnia. And a statement that the GOF book contains "90% of everything you'll ever need to know about patterns" shows an INCREDIBLE ignorance of what patterns are about and how rich the field is! Has he ever even seen any of the PLoPD books? What about The POSA books? Analysis Patterns? Or ANY of the books in the Software Patterns Series from AWL...
IMHO, he should stick to things he knows about, and try not to give advice in areas where he hasn't done due diligence in fully understanding the subject...
Kyle
 
Pradeep bhatt
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GoF is difficult to follow.
 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
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