This week's book giveaways are in the Jython/Python and Object-Oriented programming forums.
We're giving away four copies each of Machine Learning for Business: Using Amazon SageMaker and Jupyter and Object Design Style Guide and have the authors on-line!
See this thread and this one for details.
Win a copy of Machine Learning for Business: Using Amazon SageMaker and JupyterE this week in the Jython/Python forum
or Object Design Style Guide in the Object-Oriented programming forum!
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Advice on how to determine processing power requirement

 
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Hi,
I have a question which I greatly appreciate if someone can advice on.
However, if I have post to a wrong forum, I apologize for it.
Firstly, a non related question, what techology is Amazon.com using for their website?
e.g. J2EE, ASP, CGI etc?
using netscape-commerce, IIS, apache?
from this google link, it seem to be netscape-commerce, but using IDServe give the result of Apache
google thread
Secondly, for website of such scale, how do an architect determine the processing power required during the design phase.
e.g. how many machines are required to be clustered to give the desired reponse time.
Another example will be website like Olympics or World Cup where the site has millions of hits per day. How do the architect determine the processing power requirement and what are they actually using as their hardward platform.
Thanks for any view on this area.
Cheers.

Han Ming
 
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Read Performance Analysis for Java Websites by Stacy Joines, et. al. It was written by a few of the engineers at IBM who have experience in planning, implementing and troubleshooting very large web sites like Schwab, and the Olympics, and the U.S. Open. The kind of estimation tools you are looking for can be found there.
Kyle
[ March 22, 2003: Message edited by: Kyle Brown ]
 
HanMing Low
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Hi Kyle,
Thanks so much for your reply.
Great to know that there is a book on this topic.
I should be getting it soon.
Sad enough, the Amazon site also recommended "J2EE Performance Testing with BEA WebLogic Server" which I have won in the giveaway some months back but didn't received it eventually.

So, I guess have to buy both copy then.
Cheers and thanks again for your reply.

Han Ming
 
sharp shooter, and author
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I'll post a message in moderators only to see what's happened to your book...
Simon
 
HanMing Low
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Hi Simon,
Thanks for your help.
Anyway, it's a bonus.
So, it's great to have it, but ok if there is nothing could be done about it.
Cheers.

Han Ming
 
mister krabs
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Originally posted by HanMing Low:
Sad enough, the Amazon site also recommended "J2EE Performance Testing with BEA WebLogic Server" which I have won in the giveaway some months back but didn't received it eventually.

So, I guess have to buy both copy then.


Ouch! I wish you had told us sooner. The publisher, Expert Press, is a subsidiary of Wrox. Wrox, unfortuantely, has gone out of business so you won't be getting your book. Sorry!
 
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I don't know about amazon.com, but I know that yahoo is a C++ appl; its GUI is in HTML/DHTML. No Swing. This info is current from someone working there.
The erstwhile Netscape's application server using the underlying BEA Tuxedo transaction server was a C++ appl. (Etrade used to use it some years ago)
To know what technology some company is using, try visiting their website's "career" page and see what kind of "skillsets" they are hiring. (Only if someone is hiring !!)
Thanks, Sudd
 
HanMing Low
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Hi,
Thanks for the feedbacks.
So sad about the book.

Anyway, I did went to Amazon.com Jobs website to take a look
amazon's job
It does seems like it's the same as Yahoo which is C++ app.
So, it has more or less answered the question, has it?

Cheers.

Han Ming
 
Forget Steve. Look at this tiny ad:
Java file APIs (DOC, XLS, PDF, and many more)
https://products.aspose.com/total/java
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