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what is meant by distributed?

 
Neelima Paramsetty
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hi,
the diffrence between EJB and java beans is distributed(everyone tell that).Then what is the exact meaning of distributed?
i think it is sillly Ques.but i do not know .ANy body help me to find out.
Thanks in advance,
Neelima
 
Peter Storch
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Distributed means an application is running (is able to run) on diffrent machines across a network.
With J2EE you can deploy the web part of your application to a web container like tomcat and put your business components in EJB on a EJB Container (WebSphere, WebLogic, ...).
In most applications scenarios you deploy them to one J2EE AppServer which is running on one machine with one JVM. But if your application grows (usage, load) you can easily deploy your app to more than one machine without changing your code.
With this possibility most J2EE AppServers support Clustering, Failover and all these things.
But the main point of "distributed" is that there is a network protocoll (e.g. RMI over IIOP)between two layers of your application.
For small application this seems to be an overhead, but with this technic you have the possibility to scale up your production environment.
 
Chris Mathews
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Originally posted by Neelima Paramsetty:
the diffrence between EJB and java beans is distributed(everyone tell that).

There are a lot more differences between javabeans and ejbs then just remoteability. In fact, the current version of EJB does not require ejbs to even be remote...
The biggest difference between ejbs and standard javabeans is that ejbs must run inside of an EJB Container. The EJB Container provides all sorts of services such as remotability, transactioning, security, persistance, data caching, etc.
 
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