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Core J2EE Patterns  RSS feed

 
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I want that book! I would really help me out.
Francisco
 
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You have come the right place!
 
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You might want to re-read the rules though...
 
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Here is my shot
BTW, in the Email newsletter it said:


The giveaway starts on Tuesday, Aug 25th. The drawing will be held on Friday, Aug 29th.


Ehh, my question is: In what year :roll:
More to the topic, how does J2EE patterns differ from patterns (The gang of four?) in general? Does it involve the building steps of a bean? And finally, is it safe to say that EJB is just a supreset of OO in general?
 
Pradeep bhatt
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Ehh, my question is: In what year


Do you know todays date

More to the topic, how does J2EE patterns differ from patterns (The gang of four?) in general? Does it involve the building steps of a bean? And finally, is it safe to say that EJB is just a supreset of OO in general?


J2EE patterns focuses on J2EE whereas GOF was a general pattern. Patterns do not talk about building beans. It is a best solution for a recurring problem that occur in J2EE. These solution have been successfully applied by people in their projects.
EJB is not a super set of OO. EJB are resuable components to build scalable, transactional, secure entripse applications.
For J2EE patterns read this link
http://developer.java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/J2EE/patterns/
[ August 26, 2003: Message edited by: Pradeep Bhat ]
 
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Hi guys,
Is it true that there's a secret "Red Bull" J2EE pattern that is the real power behind using J2EE patterns? ;>
More to the point, do you have a "favorite" pattern or patterns? One or more patterns that are 20% of the total list but solve 80% (or at least quite a few) of the problems?
Solveig
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solveig@datingdesignpatterns.com
http://www.datingdesignpatterns.com
The original design patterns.
 
Pradeep bhatt
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More to the point, do you have a "favorite" pattern or patterns?


Yes, FrontController and Session faacade are the favourites.
[ August 26, 2003: Message edited by: Pradeep Bhat ]
 
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More to the topic, how does J2EE patterns differ from patterns (The gang of four?) in general? Does it involve the building steps of a bean? And finally, is it safe to say that EJB is just a supreset of OO in general?


The GoF patterns are more generic patterns suitable for a wide variety of technologies/languages/environments. The J2EE patterns are specific to J2EE applications developed using technologies such as servlets, JSPs, EJBs and so on (and no, these patterns are not related to "building steps").
Enterprise JavaBeans are not really object-oriented. They are a component technology, which is a whole different beast. I'm not saying that EJB would be anti-OO, however.

EDIT: Interesting, 3 answers were submitted to this thread while I was typing... Must train typing, I guess
[ August 26, 2003: Message edited by: Lasse Koskela ]
 
Leslie Chaim
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EJB is not a super set of OO. EJB are resuable components to build scalable, transactional, secure entripse applications.
But wasn't the OO paradigm shift from procedural programming suppose to do that?
I'm not saying that EJB would be anti-OO, however.
Then let me refine the question: Is it safe to say that the creation of EJBs are just objects which follow all the strict rules of OO, plus the conventions of the EJB spec itself. I am taking about writing the actual bean.
Speaking about conventions is there anything more to EJBs other then the its formal conventions?
 
Pradeep bhatt
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it safe to say that the creation of EJBs are just objects which follow all the strict rules of OO, plus the conventions of the EJB spec itself. I am taking about writing the actual bean.


Yes, they follow all the rule of OO. It would be beter if you be more specific.
 
Lasse Koskela
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Then let me refine the question: Is it safe to say that the creation of EJBs are just objects which follow all the strict rules of OO, plus the conventions of the EJB spec itself. I am taking about writing the actual bean.


The EJB specification pretty much dictates the class structure and which methods go where. Beyond that, you are free to use inheritance, polymorphism, etc.

Speaking about conventions is there anything more to EJBs other then the its formal conventions?


Not really. But it's the conventions (a standard) that makes Enterprise JavaBeans a powerful technology.
 
(instanceof Sidekick)
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Speaking about conventions is there anything more to EJBs other then the its formal conventions?


At its heart, J2EE (EJB is but one part) is nothing more than standards and conventions. The value we programmers get is that the standards require vendors to implement great gobs of functionality in the "container". The container (WebSphere, WebLogic, JBoss, etc) must provide certain services to be J2EE compliant. Most of those services are very powerful, and Sun's patterns are all about using them to the best effect.
 
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