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J2EE Compliant application

 
Ram Anand
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When will an application can be called as J2EE compliant?

- When it uses Servlets and Jsps
- When it implements the MVC architecture
- When it can be deployed on any J2EE compliant server

Or are there any specific rules or specifications to claim an application to be J2EE compliant? If so, can anyone point some links where i can readmore details.

I tried to search in this forum for earlier posts. But not clear with the answer.

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Ram
 
Kishore Dandu
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J2EE in my opinion is more of a spec for realizing distributed systems. If you some thing not in the J2EE spec along with some in it, that is the system developer's choice(this is happening more often now a days, since people may replace entire EJB layer with Spring compliant setup or complement it with Hibernate etc).

So, J2EE compliant application does not make sense to me. If they are ISO certified etc that makes sense to me.

If some one says "our application is J2EE compliant", I think u can laugh on their face. If they say "we use J2EE for better systems development", I would consider them as they mean business.
 
somkiat puisungnoen
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When will an application can be called as J2EE compliant?


J2EE is specification for standard of Distributed Application.

So J2EE make it easy to Portable in another J2EE server.
 
Pradeep bhatt
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So J2EE make it easy to Portable in another J2EE server.


Only if the application does not use vendor specific feature. If the vendor specific feature is not available in another app server, you need to think about workaround.
 
Ram Anand
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Can we say that the J2EE spec is more appropriate for the application servers and not for the applicaions?
 
Kishore Dandu
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J2EE spec is for applications as well.

With out it how do they make some features that are based on J2EE(I mean J2EE spec??).
 
Ram Anand
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J2EE spec what i feel is for certifying any application server as J2EE compliant. I didnt mean that the spec is only for app servers.

With respect to applications, they make use of the specifications just to use whatever relevant technology is best suited for them.

So, J2EE compliant application does not make sense to me. If they are ISO certified etc that makes sense to me.


As you said, there is nothing called J2EE compliant application. If so, there should be a set of rules which says that, if the application satisfies the following criteria then it is J2EE compliant. I dont think there is any such rule available.
 
Kishore Dandu
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Originally posted by Ram Anand:
J2EE spec what i feel is for certifying any application server as J2EE compliant. I didnt mean that the spec is only for app servers.

With respect to applications, they make use of the specifications just to use whatever relevant technology is best suited for them.



As you said, there is nothing called J2EE compliant application. If so, there should be a set of rules which says that, if the application satisfies the following criteria then it is J2EE compliant. I dont think there is any such rule available.


I don't think people would want another level of this kind of stuff you are suggesting.

Let the productive guys work through the JSR route and get things accomplished.
 
Terry Mullett
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A thing can be "compliant" with a normative specification (such as the J2EE spec) and "compatible" with an implementation (even a theoretical one) of that spec. Servers are compliant to some degree, and applications are compatible to some degree.

So what about all that stuff in the specs regarding the developer's role, or programming restrictions? Those just describe the developer-facing aspects of a compliant server. It's still a server spec.

So when somebody says their application is J2EE compliant, you should read that to mean that it will behave well in J2EE-compliant servers. Speaking more strictly their application is J2EE compatible.... that's splitting hairs, though. Doesn't sound like anything to have an aneurism over.
 
Abhinav Srivastava
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We have heard about J2EE compliant servers or containers. To put the J2EE label they have to pass Sun's compatibility test.
Interesting part is "What is a J2EE application" ?
My two cents -
1. The goal of J2EE specification is to create an environment which is required by enterprise wide (typically distributed/web enabled) applications.
2. J2EE Specification also specifies how the application should be packaged.
As long as the application keeps itself within the realms of J2EE specs (api usage) and has been packaged in the standard way would be J2EE compliant. And that would make it portable across different J2EE containers. However, the application loses this advantage the moment it starts leveraging container specific features which are of course not mandated by J2EE specs. Its no more a J2EE application.
 
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