• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other Pie Elite all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Ron McLeod
  • Rob Spoor
  • Tim Cooke
  • Junilu Lacar
Sheriffs:
  • Henry Wong
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
Saloon Keepers:
  • Jesse Silverman
  • Tim Holloway
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Moores
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Al Hobbs
  • Mikalai Zaikin
  • Piet Souris

LDAP & Active Directory Explained (please)

 
Greenhorn
Posts: 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi all,

I have a few simple questions I am hoping someone can assist with. I am going to take a stab at my questions so as to help direct your answers if that makes any sense.


1.) What is Active Directory (is active directory the repository for user name, PWD other confidential information like access rights and what groups this user belongs to ?)if so why not just keep the information in a regaulr DB, with a common (web services)was of sharing the authentication data?

2.) What is LDAP (is L D A P - a standard if so, for what?)

3.) How do they relate to each other ?


If someone could help me understand these concepts (for the purpose of a single user sign on to more than one application from differnt vendors better I would much appreciate it.

Thanks,

Gary
 
Greenhorn
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Microsoft's hierarchical Directory Service that is part of Windows 2000 architecture designed to centralize and standardize the automation of user data, security, and distributed resources network management.

it uses Kerberos authentication, as well as allows policies in various groups to do all sorts of magic. Rights, scripts, softwares can all be managed thru AD. I think the real strong point of AD is not only its range of abilities for a whole network, but that its a secure and proven environment. And has been developed for yrs. DOes that help?

LDAP
Last modified: Thursday, March 04, 2004



Short for Lightweight Directory Access Protocol, a set of protocols for accessing information directories. LDAP is based on the standards contained within the X.500 standard, but is significantly simpler. And unlike X.500, LDAP supports TCP/IP, which is necessary for any type of Internet access. Because it's a simpler version of X.500, LDAP is sometimes called X.500-lite.

Although not yet widely implemented, LDAP should eventually make it possible for almost any application running on virtually any computer platform to obtain directory information, such as email addresses and public keys. Because LDAP is an open protocol, applications need not worry about the type of server hosting the directory.

http://groups.google.com/groups?selm=3e3176ee%240%24226%24cc9e4d1f%40news.dial.pipex.com

So i think its often used w Linux/unix Google on if you still want more hands on explanations
hope it helps

Originally posted by Garry Garrson:
Hi all,

I have a few simple questions I am hoping someone can assist with. I am going to take a stab at my questions so as to help direct your answers if that makes any sense.


1.) What is Active Directory (is active directory the repository for user name, PWD other confidential information like access rights and what groups this user belongs to ?)if so why not just keep the information in a regaulr DB, with a common (web services)was of sharing the authentication data?

2.) What is LDAP (is L D A P - a standard if so, for what?)

3.) How do they relate to each other ?


If someone could help me understand these concepts (for the purpose of a single user sign on to more than one application from differnt vendors better I would much appreciate it.

Thanks,

Gary

 
(instanceof Sidekick)
Posts: 8791
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There is a big overlap between what databases and LDAP could do. LDAP is especially good at cross-platform, high speed, high volume read-only access. It's often used for userid-password authentication and function authorization because of the speed advantages. Because it is language and platform agnostic it's nice in enterprise integration situations.

Data is more hierarchical than relational, it doesn't do SQL, it doesn't do heavy updates as well as a regular db engine.

For a while lots of people talked about it like magic - wave a little LDAP at a problem and it goes away. It's more like a database in many places - a technology option, not a solution.

 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic