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When ejbCreate and setSessionContext get called?  RSS feed

 
John McDonald
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Hello there,
EJBs are in the pool and get activated and passivated when the container feels appropriate to do so. I have a question if ejbCreate and setSessionContext get called if they are activated from the pool. They are surely got called when bean are freshly created.

Another question is that ejbLoad and ejbStore are called by the container automatically? What are their invocation orders in relation to ejbPassivate ejbCreate? Thanks a bunch.

John
 
clive jordan
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Hi John,

ejbStore() and ejbLoad() are called by the container.

For Entity beans:
- ejbActivate() is called when the container needs to service a client request.
- The container then contacts the database and sucks out the data it needs to load up the bean.
- The container then calls ejbLoad() once the bean is ready (I find it easier to think of it as 'ejbLoaded()').
- Now the bean is ready, the business method can act on it.
- When the bean is finished with (business method complete), the container calls ejbStore() to indicate the database is going to be updated (think of as 'ejbStoring()').
- The db is then updated.
- ejbPassivate() is called from the container to indicate the bean has been released back to the pool.

Cheers,
Clive
 
Valentin Tanase
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Hi John,

In a nutshell beans are going from Does-Not-Exist state to the Ready state, when they are able to service client requests. Entity EJBs and SLSBs are going through the Pooled state as well. For these two type of beans, The setSessionContext is called when the bean is transitioning from Does-Not-Exist state to the Pooled state. The container will pool bean instances as needed and clients have no control over this process. The setSessionContext method is called for SFSB when the bean is transitioning from Does-Not-Exist state to Pooled statet, via creation (clients call create on home interface).
The ejbCreate on the other hand is called always for entity EJBs and SFSBs via creation. SLSBs on the other hand are created as they are added to the pool (the create call on the home interface returns only a reference, it doesn�t physically create the instance).
ejbLoad and ejbStore are called in several different circumstances and they make sense only for entity EJBs. The one that is most important to remember is related to the transactions. As per EJB specs the entity EJBs follows a load and store cycle ensuring that the bean gets the latest data from database before the transaction starts (ejbLoad) and flushes the data to the database before the transaction ends (ejbStore). Although this very simplistic approach will always work, it will mostly defeat the purpose of scalable application since there is now way to cache the data between transactions. It also makes no specification about the concurrency strategy. Most of the containers however have special settings for overcoming this issue, but this is another story�
Regards.
 
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