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End of Java EE?

 
Andr� Salvati
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Interesting,

but it arrises some issues:

1 - Why Richard Monson-Haefel has written books about EJB 3.0 and Java EE5?
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/059600978X/sr=8-2/qid=1152715869/ref=sr_1_2/102-6689131-0217733?ie=UTF8


2 - Today, is there a better option than Java EE for enterprise platforms?
[ July 12, 2006: Message edited by: Andr� Salvati ]
 
Masoud Kalali
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i dont think that JAVA EE is approaching its end.
it is pretty powerfull and easy to use with java ee 5 .
This matter is under discussion in TSS in the following thread
http://www.theserverside.com/news/thread.tss?thread_id=41283

you may look there :-)
 
Ulf Dittmer
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I prefer to look at J2EE as a collection of APIs. Maybe EJB 3 isn't going to take off. But that doesn't mean that Servlets or JavaMail or JMS or any other of the multitude of technologies that are part of it aren't going to continue to prosper.
 
Patrick Williams
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I am not one to speak for Richard Monson-Haefel. I do not know him nor have I ever met him, but his blog can be found here.. What I've gathered by reading his blog, I feel that he has become disenfranchised with how complex Java EE has become, but please read for yourself as I would not want to misrepresent his thoughts.
 
Andreas Schaefer
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Again and again and again

someone predicts the death of Java or here JEE. Like COBOL Java will stick around much longer than expected and so I am not worried. As long as there is not a technology available that can compete with JEE then JEE will not die. Sorry, but Spring and Hibernate is not going to replace JEE except for some plain and stupid web applications.

I am not happy with EJB3 but not because of the complexity. Writing Enterprise applications is complex because the business is and not because of the software. Gimme a customer than knows upfront what he wants and that JEE project will process smooth like glass. But unfortunately that is never the case and we have to deal with all the changes, inconsitencies and contradictions.
What I am missing from JEE and EJB3 is that again the design comitee was not able to come up with issues that would common problems like refeshing JDBC connections when DB bounces, stopping a MDB when a permanent failure trashed the application server through resending messages or give the EJB feedback about deployment so that the application can react on deployment/undeployment/redployment without using stupid hacks like Servlets to handle such things.

Unfortunately the comitee was more concerned with ease of use, as if that would apply in EJB development, than with solving real issues. Annotations will become a nightmare even when people now are excited about the alleged simplicity.

-Andy
 
manuel aldana
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another boring SOA-talk. from technology side, SOA is just another buzzword with old concept: communicating through interfaces.
to me SOA is rather a link/understanding-concept between IT and business. so you will only discover the so called SOA benefits if you emphasize business view (SOA-governance, business reorganziation, process-driven view, etc.), and that is a very very difficult thing to achieve, especially if the company has got many employees, which are mostly anyway annoyed with it-systems and thus aren't really willing to believe in SOA-jesus coming soon and walking over water.

two objections (there could be much more) to mr monson watching j2ee decease:
what enterprise level webapplication does mr monson develop if there are no Servlets/Portlets or similar?
which management mr monson wants do convince, to chuck all J2EE-expenses out the window of the last 10 years and invest again for 'another' promising technology?

as a platform both jse and jee will definetely survive, accompanied with alternative apis (like great spring, apache commons, testing frameworks etc....). ejb 2.x are crap, lets see what ejb3 is going to be (you still need an appserver).

anyway i think we should put more effort into making systems better maintainable, getting analysis better, improve customer-developer communication etc..
jumping on every new technology release train is just money waste, technologies cycles are just too short for that. and i think with current technologies and tools it is possible to build good apps.
[ July 12, 2006: Message edited by: manuel aldana ]
 
Pradeep bhatt
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(you still need an appserver).


JPA should work with out app server if I am not wrong.
[ July 13, 2006: Message edited by: Pradip Bhat ]
 
Pradeep bhatt
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Unfortunately the comitee was more concerned with ease of use, as if that would apply in EJB development, than with solving real issues. Annotations will become a nightmare even when people now are excited about the alleged simplicity.


I am actually happy that EJB usage has been simplied. I haven't tried them so bit early to comment but on paper they look much easier to use.
 
Robert Hayes
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This is already being talked about on the ServerSide.

Why pick it apart when people have done it already over there

But one of my favorite laughs came from this quote:

"Fundamentally, the virtual machine approach to distributed computing is through the serialization of objects leading to remote method invocation, while SOA runs on the exchange of messages between services with contracted interfaces."

Ah.. ok. Where has he been?
 
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