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Oracle integrates TopLink Essentials and Spring 2.0 ; why EJB 3.0 ?

 
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Hi! Mr.Raghu and Mr. Jonathan.

I would like know from you
the relevence,and usefulness of EJB 3.0,
when Oracle is planning to integrate (might have already done) the TopLink Essentials(EJB 3.0 Reference implementation) and Spring 2.0, a very popular frame framework that links Persitence and View layers of a web Appplication.

When you can get the same performance of EJB 3.0 entity beans from Toplink POJO s and that of EJB 3.0 session Beans from Spring 2.0, a light weight framework; with much less overhead than the EJB 3.0 puts on ApplicationServres, why would you think one should go for EJB 3.0?

Could you please clarify ?

Thanking you ,
Samba
 
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When you can get the same performance of EJB 3.0 entity beans from Toplink POJO s and that of EJB 3.0 session Beans from Spring 2.0, a light weight framework; with much less overhead than the EJB 3.0 puts on ApplicationServres, why would you think one should go for EJB 3.0?



Certainly a hot topic, considering the number of people asking this question. Jon has already answered this in a couple of topics here:

EJB3 versus Spring

EJB3 versus Spring again
 
Samba Siva Rao Kolusu
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Hi! Jaikiran,
Thanks for your reply.

But my question has not been answered.
When you have the power of (TopLink)POJO s and the flexibility of Spring,together at one place , why go for a heavy wieght EJB 3.0, whose performance is not proven?How can one be convinced that EJB 3.0 is a better choice than TopLink+Spring together?

Just because EJB 3.0 is designed by Sun and is a standard part of J2EE cannot prove its efficiency. It has to be a confluence of all the better features of all the persistence technologies circulating around!
Is EJB 3.0 that much powerful and flexible as Spring+TopLink or Spring+Hibernate put together?

if not why go for EJB 3.0?

Turn a deaf eye to the hype created by sun and stick to your old folks(Spring,hibernate ,toplink,etc).

Correct me if I am wrong.
egards,
Samba.
 
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Hi Samba-
Volumes have been written on this subject, and for every point made on the subject, there are three bloggers waiting in the wings with a counter argument.

I have already expressed my thoughts on the value of standards, but as a further point, I will say that if you like Spring, you could frame the issue not as "What about EJB3 vs. Spring" but "What about EJB3 *and* Spring". Spring is a perfectly good light-weight framework, and EJB3 has implicitly endorsed it by incorporating some of its core concepts. However, there are legitimate concerns about Spring's scalability, and it doesn't offer remoting support, something that is built into EJB3. These issues can be addressed, in cases, by wrapping Spring in EJB3, to take advantage of the EJB3 container's built-in services. The EJB container, and its surrounding Java EE server, in the context of an vendor-specific application server, offer a wide range of enterprise features that justify their use, particularly for large-scale deployments.

Beyond that, I'll leave this issue to other posters, or the legions of bloggers that are a google search away...

Regards,
Jon
 
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