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regularly change jobs to avoid stress

 
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The military has practices like that, moving troops to avoid negative effects on the person, on staying too long on a specific assignment.

IT jobs probably has such too. I wonder if this makes sense.
 
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Not sure about that. Changing jobs (more so than changing projects) can be quite stressful, too.

I think in the military it's about not leaving troops deployed in harms way for too long, which obviously is highly stressful, quite unlike any civilian job.
 
Jesus Angeles
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Yes thats true. IT jobs are less war-like, although I do feel like that a lot.
 
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only money matters,
greater the monetory effect ,lesser the stress effect
 
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the question is not about money ..... in starting days of career money does matter but after a certain period its the type of work that wins... if you dont love yur work dont enjoy challenges than there is not point in sticking to a job for money ..... in long term its the zeal and challenges that win against money... this doesnt mean money is not important .... but gradually as you are experienced they(money) are bind to come ... in maximum cases people sacrifice money for good work ... so the bottomline is that WORK IN FIELD OF YOUR INTREST ONLY AND NOT IN FIELD GIVING YOU MONEY AND NO SATISFACTION ......
 
Ulf Dittmer
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Originally posted by venkatesh pendharkar:
only money matters,
greater the monetory effect ,lesser the stress effect



With all due respect, that's an absurd notion. Quite often a position will be paid highly precisely because it entails the absorption of large quantities of stress.
 
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Eventually the more money you make, the higher the stress levels.

There are scenarios where that's not true at all because of whatever reason, but for the normal avg person, if you move up in your career and demand more money, more will be expected from you.

If you start out as a programmer who is given specs, told what to do and not to do, you'll probably make decent money and might like your job. If you never move up or lead a project and like being just the programmer, it probably won't lead to much stress. However, eventually you'll either be replaced by outsourcing or younger new employees who make a lot less than you. That'll cause stress.

Doing similar things over and over usually leads to less stress because you know how to do something, how long it'll take, and so on. Doing something new means you might not know how long it'll take or what's exactly involved. You could learn, but learning means making your brain figure somethng new out. Nothing wrong with that.

In the end it is always about the money. As you get older, money becomes a lot more important because you have kids and a family to support, aging parents, aging body parts, retirement and so on to think about. Unless you became a millionaire off of stock options, most people's number one stress is about money.

You may love what you do and love your job, but if you can't pay your bills, money becomes a huge issue.

This notion about "loving your job" is some BS people spew out that don't know any better.

Yeah you should like what you do, but there are various factors involved with that scenario. One, maybe you like your job but hate your boss. Maybe you like your boss and job but hate your co-workers. Maybe you used to like your job but now have new management.

It really depends on who you are and what you do.
Having 1 million bucks saved for retirement sounds like a great thing. Unless of course you retire at 55 years old and are used to making 100K per year. That means by the time your 65 years old you could be broke if you don't watch things. On top of that, if you had children in your thirties like many people in the US seem to do now, that means your children probably are still in school or college. It is always about money.

No money can't buy you a stress free life, but at the end of the day it is a lot easier to deal with stress related issues at work then fearing if you can put food on your table or pay the mortgage.
 
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It doesn't matter how good you are, or how experienced you are, IMHO, the first few months of any new job (or contract) is always stressful.

Too much new stuff to learn -- different technologies, different tools, different procedures, new people, politics, etc. A huge desire to get up to speed quickly, and to prove yourself.

Changing jobs is not a good way to avoid stress.

Henry
 
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Originally posted by Henry Wong:
It doesn't matter how good you are, or how experienced you are, IMHO, the first few months of any new job (or contract) is always stressful.

Too much new stuff to learn -- different technologies, different tools, different procedures, new people, politics, etc. A huge desire to get up to speed quickly, and to prove yourself.

Changing jobs is not a good way to avoid stress.

Henry



I wholeheartedly agree! First 3-6 months in a new job are definitely more stressful as you need to establish yopurself from scratch.

But often if you stay for long without demanding - people tend to take you for granted and that affects your monetary growth as well.
 
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Originally posted by william gates:
Eventually the more money you make, the higher the stress levels.



I would argue that this doesn't have to be true, but often is.

While it is true that high stress jobs demand more pay to compensate (as Ulf noted), the reverse is not necessarily true. What is generally true is that higher paying jobs have more responsibility and most people tend to take more stress from more respnsibility. Personally, as more career progresses, I've felt less stressed at my jobs, because I've had more visibility/control and so have received fewer surprises and have wound up in fewer constrained situations. (Of course, in my personal life I suppose the opposite has been true as I've gone from a kid who had parents who took care of me to have to plan for a family, retirement, etc.)

--Mark
 
william gates
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I do agree that the farther up the chain you move, you have more say in what does and does not happen. But it really depends on how far you move up that ladder and how much responsibility that comes with it.

If you work for a software company that has many new releases and you are in charge of one of their bigger releases, there will be tons of stress involved. Maybe it's one of the best solutions out there, but if it doesn't sell, it might come back on the management, on you and so on. That causes stress.

If you work on software for a manufacturing or defense or whatever firm that tracks parts that will spoil after a certain amount of time, tracks hazardous waste, makes airplanes fly on autopilot, or makes ships track incoming weapons or is responsible for saving somebodies life in a hospital, you will have stress to make sure every piece is exact. Even a .0000000001 mistake can cause disaster. That'll be stressful, especially if you are running the project, not coding it.

However if you become some program manager for support system that has been around for 20 years and there aren't that many new releases, you probably won't have as much stress because the fact is, your company might not depend on the software to save lives or make millions of dollars.

Your system might be important in the grand scheme of things in your company, but it might be more of what most software systems are today, they support an aspect of a business or government or whatever organization. Whether it's payroll, accounting, human resources, documentation, change requests, and so on. Many of these systems have been around for years and operate rather well for what they do. They might even have been upgraded over the years.

So while the system might be very important in supporting your company, it doesn't specifically generate revenue or save or protect lives. It's a need but it's not something customers or management notice often.

Stress levels are a relative factor. It depends on where you work, what kind of systems you work on, and for who you work for.

Changing jobs might help, it might not help. You never really know what you are getting into until you've been somewhere for awhile. What might look great may turn out to be not so great and vice versa.. And It's hard to determine what kind of stress levels there will be through a few interviews. Yeah you can look around at the people and get a feel, but most people tend to judge things in a way that suits whatever they are feeling. If it seems like a great fit, you'll probably overlook what people look like or seem to be feeling. If it seems like a bad fit, you probably will find fault with many things. It's all about perspective.

I think you should always weigh your options but come with a more objective view of things. Because unless you are being underpaid and hate your job, your co-workers, your management, and your company, you won't really know if what seemed like greener pastures upon initial hire actually turns out to be a nightmare later on.
 
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More money = more stress? That is only if you are moving up the hierarchy in a particular company.
A way of quickly boosting income in the short term is go from perm to contract. Same role, Same responsibilties(almost)...but double money.
The more stress is not related to more money. It is related to change as already pointed out. If one is moved to a role that is significantly different (in whatever way) from his old role, even if the new role pays less, it will generate stress.

I am not personally a big supporter of the more money = more stress model...because it demotivates me.
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