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Confirmation on Architecture - Enterprise Application  RSS feed

 
Subhash Bhushan C
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Hi all,

We are planning to build a J2EE Enterprise Application, aimed to support online lending of objects. We are starting from scratch. I have extensive experience in Microsoft and Oracle technologies, and solid knowledge of Java, but am relatively new to J2EE.

We have decided to use Eclipse as the Dev platform, JBoss as the application server and MySQL as the backend. These s/f have been chosen for their open-source and platform independent nature. We chose J2EE because we want our application to be geared towards Web Services.

On the J2EE side, plan is to use Entity Beans+Hibernate for persistence, POJOs for business logic and JSPs+Struts for rendering on the web.

I have 2 questions:
1. Is the combination of software acceptable? Are there any concerns that you guys see?
2. Does the J2EE plan sound ok, and are there any loop holes in it, that I am missing?

Also, if you guys know of any primers surrounding these areas, where I can start reading from, please do let me know.

Thanks in Advance.
 
Bill Shirley
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Enterprise Javabeans 3.0, 5th Edition
O'Reilly
Bill Burke & Richaerd Monson-Haefel
 
Abhinav Srivastava
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Eclipse IDE Java Oracle
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My choice would be POJO+Hibernate wrapped by Session Beans.
[ January 31, 2008: Message edited by: Abhinav Srivastava ]
 
Roger Chung-Wee
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If you have extensive experience of Oracle, why not use an Oracle DB. Your J2EE learning curve is considerable, and it will cost you time and therefore money to learn to use another DB.

Another question: Why are you thinking of Struts and Hibernate?
 
Subhash Bhushan C
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Originally posted by Roger Chung-Wee:
If you have extensive experience of Oracle, why not use an Oracle DB. Your J2EE learning curve is considerable, and it will cost you time and therefore money to learn to use another DB.

Another question: Why are you thinking of Struts and Hibernate?


I am not going with Oracle for two reasons. One, we want this system to be open-source and two, it is meant to be a low-budget project.

Thank you so much for the pointed question. You definitely hit the mark by questioning my motives. Thats exactly where I need help. These features are definitely useful, but I am not sure whether they will add definite value to whatever I am doing.

Hibernate: I plan to use Entity Beans to manage my database operations. When I looked it up, I read that Hibernate is a good Persistence and Query service.
Struts: I am pretty weak when it comes to coding and layouting web pages (ASPs, HTMLs etc), so I was searching around for a framework to help me with it. Struts seems to make it easy.

We have about 2 months to complete this project. My only bottleneck here is the Technology, so wanted to confirm if these are really required and make my work easier.

Awaiting your reply,
[ January 31, 2008: Message edited by: Subhash Bhushan ]
 
Roger Chung-Wee
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It's worth bearing in mind that open source does not necessarily mean low cost. Not only do you have to learn how to use products unfamiliar to you, but should you discover half-way through your project that something like MySQl is missing functionality which you need, then it's no longer cheap.

I have no experience of Hibernate and little of Struts, so I cannot comment on the merits of these products. What I would say is that you are adding complexity (Hibernate, Struts) onto complexity (JSPs, EJBs, JBoss). This looks like a major risk for a project which lasts for only two months and when you have limited experience of J2EE.

I suggest that you begin by building part of your app, say a single request which updates the DB and returns a response to the user, using only JSPs, EJBs, container-managed transactions and POJOs. I strongly suspect that you will have your hands full in doing this and will have no time for any other technologies.
 
Subhash Bhushan C
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Accepted. And that is the way I am planning to go too. I have already started with building a basic mechanism, before even venturing towards Hibernate or Struts.

Thank you so much for the input, Roger.
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