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Java EE Experience - how do I get it ?  RSS feed

 
Alan Morgan
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hello all,

I am interested in learning about java ee technologies but I do not work in the area.

I am not quite sure how to go about getting experience in the area.
Does anyone have any ideas ?

I was thinking along the lines of sample projects that I could work in to give me as real world an example as possible and touches as many of the related technologies as possible.
Any ideas greatly appreciated.

thanks.
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Alan,
Have you read about it yet? If not, you could follow along with the books on your computer and actually try things out.

If you already know about Java EE, you could build a sample app like the shopping cart app - or something more interesting to you personally.
 
Ulf Dittmer
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The APIs most widely used are probably servlets/JSP for building web applications, and JDBC for accessing databases; you're likely to encounter both in most JEE projects. Those would be good starting points for learning.
 
Alan Morgan
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Thanks for the replies guys

I have been reading about the technologies.
I guess what I was hoping for was maybe a book or something that had a sample project running the whole way through it as a means of practical experience

thanks
 
Jimmy Clark
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A close read of the following material will give you great understanding of the Java Enterprise Edition. You should review each class and learn what it is used for. This experience will give you the knowledge to develop your own applications in time. Good luck!

http://java.sun.com/javaee/5/docs/api/
 
Satishkumar Somalanka
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Hi,

Its nice to start learning J2EE is by getting clarity on how J2EE is composed, java platform has clear separation of interfaces and implementation. try to figure out what are all components make up J2EE/J2SE or SDK/JRE. Know how J2EE supports enterprise needs by different specifications.


Thanks.
[ May 24, 2008: Message edited by: Satishkumar Somalanka ]
 
K. Tsang
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Hi Alan, I learned J2EE just like 2-3 months ago. I started learning servlets then JSP then build pure web apps. Then add db into it. Then learn EJB then migrate db stuff to EJB (I'm in this stage now). Then voila you will have a true J2EE app LOL.
 
Alan Morgan
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Hi Tsang,

What kind of app did you build ?
Was it big enough to give you experience of a good lot of the technologies ?

thanks.
 
Eddie Lee
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If you already know Java or other OOP language.

You should familiarize yourself with design patterns if you don't already know them.

You should familiarize yourself about J2ee architecture (Servlets, EJB, JMS, JSP, JSF, Portlets, etc) which are based on design paradigms.

You should also familiarize yourself with related J2ee technologies such as Struts, Hibernate, Spring..
 
Alan Morgan
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I have 9 years of Java, know my design patterns, have looked at J2EE architecture.

Its the familiarize yourself with Struts, Hibernate, Spring that gets me. I can read about them alright but not until I do something real with them will I feel I know them
 
Eddie Lee
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You could try to get Sun Certifications in Web. Otherwise, you would probably need to be assigned a project that uses those technologies or build one yourself at home during your spare time.

The first thing you would need is a Sun Certified J2ee Application Server like IBM Websphere or Sun Glassfish. From there you would just add the J2ee components you would like to use. I guess that sounds too simple. But I guess it's a start.
 
Alan Morgan
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A project to work on at home is exactly what I am looking for.
I was just wondering if there was a project out there (in a book or anywhere else) that would suit being implemented in an EE environment.

thanks.
 
Eddie Lee
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I'm not sure of any sample projects but a real world example you could consider toying around with these:

Sun Glassfish
Struts front controller
Spring Framework
Hibernate - DAO
Axis2 Web Service Engine
JSP

You could also look into EJBs and JMS for more J2ee exposure.

[ June 03, 2008: Message edited by: Eddie Lee ]
[ June 03, 2008: Message edited by: Eddie Lee ]
 
Scott Selikoff
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Originally posted by Alan Morgan:
I can read about them alright but not until I do something real with them will I feel I know them

I'm going to go out on a limb and say you cannot possibly get real world experience in J2EE without having a job in J2EE. Practicing with sample applications at home can teach you a lot, but does not provide any real experience in working in a corporate environment with it.

If you're looking for enough experience to be hired for a J2EE developer, you run into the chicken and the egg paradox. Most managers want people with J2EE work experience (at home practice means nothing to them), but in order to get such experience you have to all ready have a job in it.

It's hard to find a job willing to hire an EJB/Stuts/Hibernate developer who has no real world experience with it. I'd suggest going for a development job that relies on your java foundation, but with plans to branch in J2EE. Keep in mind if you go for a straight out J2EE developer position, you're competing with people who really do (or claim to) have J2EE experience, therefore your name is going to be low on the list (especially among HR people who just look for buzz words).

Exception: You can find some managers willing to take a chance on you learning J2EE on the job but IMHO managers like that are far and few between (since most of the time you'll never make it past HR). The phrase "I've practiced or read up the the technology in my spare time" usually signals that this person is not qualified for the position.
[ June 03, 2008: Message edited by: Scott Selikoff ]
 
K. Tsang
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Hi Alan, if you have some java experience, then getting started with j2ee isn't hard. A good start is to attempt those assignments from java college, especially the video assignment (with JDBC). At least that what I did to pick up servlets and JSP.

As for other tech like Struts, Spring, Hibernate, etc thats up to you but should familiarize yourself with their capabilities/limitations/adv/disadv.

In fact scanning through the J2EE 5 specs is a start too.
 
K. Tsang
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Originally posted by Scott Selikoff:

I'm going to go out on a limb and say you cannot possibly get real world experience in J2EE without having a job in J2EE. Practicing with sample applications at home can teach you a lot, but does not provide any real experience in working in a corporate environment with it.

[ June 03, 2008: Message edited by: Scott Selikoff ]


To some extend I agree with Scott. If you are NOT currently doing Java in the corporate setting then doing J2EE is practically can't be reality. However with several, I mean several, projects of your own building a portfolio of your work is a good indication of what you can do with J2EE or J2SE.

There may be times that your potential employer may know about your site (given a real domain for public) then you may have a chance. I too not doing Java at corporate setting (shh doing PHP) ... but why did my current employer hired me? I didn't have web or real programming experience so to speak before (mostly tech support ... on legacy systems too) but somehow I know my PHP during the interview and of course I apply for those jobs LOL

[ June 03, 2008: Message edited by: K. Tsang ]
[ June 03, 2008: Message edited by: K. Tsang ]
 
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