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New role as manager

 
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I am a softspoken, easily agreeing, easily accepting kinda person. Do not like controversies, enjoy friendly environment. I am supposed to take up a manager role in next couple of months. Though I am very exited about it I need to work towards transforming myself from present comfortable environment to a manager doing people/work management effectively. How to do that? suggestions please.
 
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Most of the *good* managers I've encountered are good listeners and diplomatic. If you have these qualities, you're already a winner (read manager) .

AK
 
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The best book I've read about management is "Peopleware." Personally I suggest you do the following

1) Read a book a month on management.
2) Regularly alk to senior management at your company about management techniques.
3) Talk to HR about training they might have
4) Find managers you like outside your company (friends, former bosses, friends of your [parents) and talk to them regularly about management techniques.

You don't need conflict to be a good manager. However, I personally find it helpful. Understand that when managers talk about fostering conflict, it's a conflict of ideas, not a conflict of people. On my teams we'll get in heated discussions challenging each other's ideas. But in the end, people still respect each other, and the disagreement is about ideas, not about individuals. If you're interested in work on this area, I'd recommend books on fostering conflict, or perhaps some GE or Jack Welsh books.

--Mark
 
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:


You don't need conflict to be a good manager............

--Mark



And to add to what mark said, do not forget that a good manager is first and foremost a good person at heart.
 
Shreya Rao
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Thanks for your suggestions Abhijit, Mark and Devesh, I will take them, its certainly going o help me
 
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what kind of manager?
Project Manager at a software vendor or a technical manager or manager of a MIS or IT department in a big company?
 
Shreya Rao
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My apologies for not being specific!, its going to be project manager role.

Thanks,
Shreya Rao
 
Shreya Rao
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My apologies for not being specific!, its going to be project manager role.

Thanks,
Shreya Rao
 
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All the very best for your new role.

One of the most important things which one manager should possess is good listening skills.Listening to subordinates.
[ July 09, 2007: Message edited by: Rahul Bhattacharjee ]
 
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Manager must be capable to handle any situation without blaming subordinates.

--Tapan
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by tapan saha:
Manager must be capable to handle any situation without blaming subordinates.



I disagree.

The above statement could be interpreted one of two ways, both of which are wrong. ({} added to indicate grammatical grouping.)


Interpretation #1:
{Manager must be capable to handle any situation} without blaming subordinates.

A manager does not need to be able to handle any situation. That's why managers have a mangers. Good managers know when they need help and to ask for it from others--most often their managers. Overconfidence is one of the most common causes of downfall among managers. Never be afraid to ask for help--and if your manager sees that as a sign of weakness, I'd suggest looking for a job elsewhere. (Caveat: obviously you should have some level of competence, but you should not be expected to know how to handle *everything* on your own.)


Interpretation #2:
Manager must be capable to handle {any situation without blaming subordinates.}

A manager must be realistic about who is on his team. Generic blame pointing and whining is not helpful. However, unlike people and their peers, one of the jobs of a manager is to make personnel decisions. A manager must be able to realistically assess the capabilities of teams members and make changes if necessary. In my book, the number one ingredient to success is having the right people. Placing blame isn't inherently good, but a manager needs to recognize failure early and take action if necessary (and hopefully only rarely).


--Mark
[ July 09, 2007: Message edited by: Mark Herschberg ]
 
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