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Avoiding Interop  RSS feed

 
Sal DiStefano
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Hi all
I am interested to hear some of the issues you face with J2EE and .NET interop. I know Web Services is supposed to be the answer to all but is anyone actually using them in production for this purpose? What are the ups and downs?
Regards
Sal
 
Kishore Dandu
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As I mentioned in the other post, bunch of firms are using the interoperable stuff(more web services) in their production systems and many are happy about it.
Kishore.
 
Benny Thomas
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Apart from using Web Services, it there no other way of interoperating b/w .NET and Java
 
Nicholas Cheung
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In fact, I am working in such a Web Services project for Government.
There are 2 departments having different functionality. However, one of the departments need to communicate with another one. One uses J2EE framework, and the other is .NET framework.
Since Web Services is data in XML format that are transmitted in HTTP, thus, the only requirement is, both client ends understand XML is ok.
In real life, there are lots of such interoperability.
Nick
 
Dwight Peltzer
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JNetDirect has a huge list of major corporations that use their JDBC driver, and they are happy. Web services is only one answer. Many other solutions are available. DPeltzer
 
Ted Smart
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Obviously, our JDBC driver solves the low-level data access issue. But when you get into the full interop question, we have another product that is not currently available on our website call JBIS.
It enables you to model interactions between J2EE and .NET in XML and generates code (Java on the J2EE side / VB or C# on the .NET side) to implement those interactions.
Its advantages over web services are simplicity, security, logging and management. There are disadvantages in that it expects two systems to identify interaction points -- rather than simply mix and match remote calls across the J2EE/.NET barrier.
I would be interested in plugging anyone who is facing these problems in with our development team. Participation in a Beta will result in a free copy of the software.
Ted Smart
JNetDirect
http://www.jnetdirect.com
 
frisode jonge
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Sorry dwight, I am missing one or two stops here, can you explain what the JDBC Driver, and jnetdirect have to do with XML - data transfer over http ?
 
Benny Yih
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Ted,
Can you elaborate a bit on the deployment choices for JBIS interaction modeling versus a collection of "low-level" web service calls ? Are optimizations such as shared memory messages, instead of HTTPS SOAP, etc. supported ? 8-)
 
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