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Java used comercially

 
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Hi guys,

hope I got the right forum. If not, I just have a quick question. Are there any restrictions about using Java comercially? I mean I want to sell java programs. Do I have to pay something to SUN for this?
Also, the same questions for both Tomcat and MySQL? How much do I have to pay in order to use these inside the products I'm selling?
The question became three questions ).
Thanks for your info ).
 
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There are no restrictions on what you can do with the programs you create.
You can distribute Tomcat and the JRE free of charge (but read the license).
mySQL can not be used in commercial applications without paying a hefty license fee though, unless you succumb to the pressure from the creators of mySQL and release your product under the GPL which is the last thing you should consider (better use a real database engine that doesn't have such terrorist restrictions).
 
Sergiu Truta
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Thank you for your feedback Jeroen.
 
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Originally posted by Jeroen Wenting:

mySQL can not be used in commercial applications without paying a hefty license fee



I don't think thats true. The whole point in using mySQL is because its free and the user does not need a licence to use it, as opposed to commercial database vendors such as Microsoft and Oracle, who charge you licence fees.
 
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Originally posted by Jeroen Wenting:
mySQL can not be used in commercial applications without paying a hefty license fee though

This is completely untrue. You are free to use any GPL program you like to build your project. You are only affected by the GPL if you base your product off of a GPL'd one, meaning you take the source code for MySQL and alter it to create a new database. If all you're doing is using JDBC to connect to a MySQL database, it's totally free.

unless you succumb to the pressure from the creators of mySQL and release your product under the GPL which is the last thing you should consider (better use a real database engine that doesn't have such terrorist restrictions).

Your bias is clear, and I suggest you reread the GPL and documents regarding free software. First off, you cannot take the source code of any commercial product without such "terrorist restrictions", alter it, and sell it. In that sense the GPL gives you far more freedom than any commercial software. Second, if you do start with a GPL program and alter it, you must license it under the GPL only to those to whom you actually distribute it.

If you take MySQL's source, alter it, and use it in your company to run your website, you only have to give the source code to your operations team, and only if they ask for it. You do not have to release the source to the world unless you give the program to the world.

As an example, Google uses Linux and MySQL extensively. Can you please point me to their source code repository? Clearly the freedom-hating terrorists over at the FSF must have forced them to GPL all their code by now.
 
Jeroen Wenting
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No, the mySQL license specifically states that you can use the free version ONLY to create GPL software.
Anything else requires a commercial license.

mySQL isn't under GPL in that, it's even more restrictive in the rights it gives its users.
 
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Originally posted by Jeroen Wenting:

mySQL can not be used in commercial applications without paying a hefty license fee



Man, if you think $295/server/year (or even the $4995.00 license for unlimited support with 30 minute response time) is "hefty", you've never priced enterprise software. I'm working on a 2-server BEA Weblogic install that cost 20k last year alone. Then there's Oracle fees on top of that, but they get spread across several internal customers. I worked on a Broadvision deployment which cost several MILLION dollars a few years back. I think MySQL is a great product for the money.
 
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From my information, the MySql License isn't very clear, and the company isn't doing much, to make clear, in which cases you don't need to pay.
That's not looking very fair, but I guess their prices are fair, compared to some other DBs.
(While I prefer Postgres, which is the more mature OS Database AND free, even in every commercial use).

If you build your program database-vendor independently, controlled by an .ini or .xml - File for vendor and connectionstring, your program isn't derived work.
The JDBC-driver and database are freely available, and may be installed from the customer.

I guess a lot of people pay to avoid discussions.
[ March 14, 2005: Message edited by: Stefan Wagner ]
 
Jeroen Wenting
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I know what enterprise level software costs but mySQL isn't IMO enterprise level.
It's on a par with MS Access and other desktop databases that wannabe more than that like Paradox.

There's also far better FREE alternatives like Firebird and Postgress that don't hijack your own code license for religious purposes.
 
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