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Need right tool for java coding standards & code review

 
Greenhorn
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Hi all,

for my current j2ee project we are in the process of selecting right tool to define coding standards and to review existing java code.

Kindly help any one to get into right path regarding this.

thanx

Kather Basha.
 
author
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Besides a good code formatter (there are several out there, and most IDEs come with one), you don't really need a tool, in my not so humble opinion. What you need is a very basic, informal coding standard that is *in the heads* of your team, and which gets refined while your team closely collaborates on the project (assuming that they are colocated). Pair Programming, for example, is a very good "tool" for propagating a team wide coding standard.
 
Ranch Hand
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There's no substitute for a battle-tested and informed software engineer with an interest in keeping up-to-date on best practices but there are plenty of books out there that will help. First carve your requirements in to coding standards (easily automated with tools like Jalopy from Triemax) and code structure (you will need skilled developers and highly regarded books on the subject) and finally development process: Evo or UP or XP.

Those are three separate areas where the code beautifier (formatter) is the least important because it can be automated.
 
(instanceof Sidekick)
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Some of the static code review tools do a pretty cool job of spotting potential bugs, but most of them primarily critique your indenting and commenting. A good code formatter will take care of indenting, and the "standard" level of commenting they suggest is redundant at best and counter-productive or dangerous at worst. Go with human reviews.
 
Ranch Hand
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Take a look at CheckStyle
 
Rancher
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I agree partially with Ilja, you need to 'live' these values and try not to patch it after the fact.

However in our case we use Eclipse wilth a standard set of formatting rules used by everyone (and enforced) and JCSC to check code quality, although code reviews does most of this for us.
 
Ranch Hand
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If you are into static analysis tools, FindBugs and PMD are fairly good.
 
Rancher
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With PMD it's easy to add your own rules, something you will want to do sooner or later.
When selecting a tool I find it important that it integrates seemlessly into the build environment, whether that is Ant, Eclipse, NetBeans or IntelliJ. Otherwise it just won't get used as much as it should be.
Other options you might look into are JCSC, Hammurapi, lint4j and jlint. My favorites are PMD and Hammurapi (which produces very nice reports that are cross-referenced with the source code).
 
Stan James
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I have to admit my comments on tools were based on research a couple years old. A third party is applying Hammurapi to some of our code. I'll keep an open mind until I see what they come back with.
 
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