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Read this CNN report:

http://money.cnn.com/2008/03/27/news/economy/hager/index.htm?postversion=2008032812

Mark, you might be able to help Josh. He is in NJ.
[ March 28, 2008: Message edited by: S. Palanigounder ]
 
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I think last two sentences described the situation correctly:
"The consumer dictates what employers do and no one is spending money," Hager said.
"Employers don't want anybody right now because no one wants products or services."
I am not a finance guru but to me Finance,banking,entertainment industries look similar.Continuous ups and downs.
 
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Don't want to be too harsh, as I have friends affected by the subprime mess ... But c'mon!! Profiling a credit underwriter, in the NYC area, during the subprime mess? That is like profiling a bartender during prohibition.

Henry
 
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Before sending my story and picture to the papers , I would like to evaluate the consequences. I see that Joshua is reaching a huge audience; on the other hand, best practice recommendations insist on a success story format. Which side is going to win here?

An interesting, and familiar, quote from the story is

�Companies are posting jobs, but they don't seem to be hiring�.

I have seen job announcements of this sort long enough, and frequently enough, to start wondering what may be behind them: an inflexibility in matching requirements to candidates, a policy of publishing announcements with no intention to hire, or what?
 
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Originally posted by Henry Wong:
Profiling a credit underwriter, in the NYC area, during the subprime mess? That is like profiling a bartender during prohibition.



I love it!!! Especially since - in a total turnabout from normality - I'm getting more people approaching me than I was getting before the recession started.

Not minimizing anyone's pain. Just surprised to see it happening to someone else for a change.
 
Tim Holloway
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I shoulda kept my mouth shut. The phone stopped ringing.
 
S. Palanigounder
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Originally posted by Tim Holloway:
I shoulda kept my mouth shut. The phone stopped ringing.



Mark might be helpful if you are in NYC.
 
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Josh found a job in NYC after 6 months.

http://money.cnn.com/2008/09/05/news/economy/josh_gets_job/index.htm?cnn=yes
 
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Originally posted by Edvins Reisons:



I have seen job announcements of this sort long enough, and frequently enough, to start wondering what may be behind them: an inflexibility in matching requirements to candidates, a policy of publishing announcements with no intention to hire, or what?



Sometimes there is no intention to hire US citiznes, but legally they have to advertise the position before they can hire the H1Bs they already have picked out.
 
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Originally posted by herb slocomb:
legally they have to advertise the position before they can hire the H1Bs they already have picked out.



There is no recruiting requirement for an H-1B, only a Green Card.

Cheers!

Luke
 
frank davis
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Originally posted by Luke Kolin:


There is no recruiting requirement for an H-1B, only a Green Card.

Cheers!

Luke



My mixup, thanks for clarifying.

While trying to take a nap, I tried to remember the conversation I overheard some years ago between a non-citizen programmer and what she later said was a lawyer on the other side. She was the one that told me how the system worked and she actually had a Green Card in retrospect.
 
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Originally posted by herb slocomb:


Sometimes there is no intention to hire US citiznes, but legally they have to advertise the position before they can hire the H1Bs they already have picked out.



So being a US citizen may hurt you when you are looking for a job in IT area
because you are asking more and not always listening
 
frank davis
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Originally posted by Matt Brown:


So being a US citizen may hurt you when you are looking for a job in IT area
because you are asking more and not always listening



I think the general point being made was valid on its own merits. The general point being that US companies will naturally act in ways that they perceive to be to their advantage in obtaining lower cost workers.

There are many ways to do this, some legal, some not. One way is to ostensibly play the game by it rules by advertising a position they have no intention of filling with a US citizen. A co-worker explained this to me some years ago : They chose some workers from another country to sponsor, they dream up some weird combination of skills and experience that US citizens are unlikely to have but for which the foreigners have agreed to claim to have, then they advertise the position as legally required in some cases knowing that its unlikely that any US citizen will respond.
 
frank davis
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Originally posted by Matt Brown:


So being a US citizen may hurt you when you are looking for a job in IT area
because you are asking more and not always listening



Not sure if that was a personal comment directed at me, but I have no trouble finding programming jobs for the past 15 years and have always easily changed jobs every 2 - 3 years. I don't program in Java professionally, but find that these types of discussion boards help me take the pulse of the IT market in general.
 
Luke Kolin
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Originally posted by herb slocomb:
They chose some workers from another country to sponsor, they dream up some weird combination of skills and experience that US citizens are unlikely to have but for which the foreigners have agreed to claim to have, then they advertise the position as legally required in some cases knowing that its unlikely that any US citizen will respond.



It's important to note that DOL does place some restrictions on what skills employers can legitimate ask for. It does lead to some rather strange outcomes - for a while in 2005 or 2006 DOL stated that a degree could not be required for a programmer job, whereas USCIS insisted on it as a pre-requisite for an H-1B!

It's also worth noting that what DOL requires in terms of recruitment doesn't often jibe with recruitment in the real world, although things have gotten better with PERM in the past few years. When my Labor Certification was done in late 2000, my company had already gone through an advertising and recruitment process - the problem is that it was all done online, where actual job seekers looked. DOL wanted it redone via classifieds in the Sunday paper, so we obliged. Surprisingly no one responded.

But at the end of the day it is a losing proposition in my opinion to try and force yourself onto a company that does not want you, for whatever reason. I certainly don't compete on price, and therefore companies who differentiate between people primarily on that basis do not interest me. Good people are looking for good wages, interesting work and good working conditions, and if a company doesn't want to provide that, they're welcome to look overseas or import workers on an H-1B. They'll soon find that the world isn't exactly filled with IIT graduates with multiple graduate degrees who'll work for $30,000 a year.

Cheers!

Luke
 
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