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Usefulness of learning swings

 
vishal sodani
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what is the use of learning Swings?Are there any real world applications using swings?As far as applets are concerned,they are not much in vogue,since it takes a lot of time to download applets?Anyway,what special functionality applets provide which we cannot get using other web tools like flashetc.Lastly,if one wants to be a Java Developer,how good one needs to be in Swings,and which books need to reffered?
I would appreciate opinions on this subject.
 
Thomas Paul
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This is an interesting question and brings up a philosophical debate. JavaPro recently had an article discussing this topic. In the past, applets have failed because of the problems with size, download speeds, lack of widgets, and problems with JVM versions. Some of these problems are going away and we should see a renewal of Java on the client side in the next couple of years. Bandwidth issues are obviously going away as more people get access to cable or DSL and they become cheaper. Size should stop being a problem as the caching of Java applets separate from other web objects is around the corner. This will allow your applet to be stored and only re-downloaded when it is changed. JVM plug-ins solve the JVM version issues. And the widget problems are solved by Swing. So is Swing worth knowing... absolutley!
The book I have is O'Reilly's "Java Swing".
 
aseem kapoor
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swing actually sits on top of AWT ,awt inturn calls the operating system to get the look& feel ,IN SWINGS THE LOOK & FEEL CAN BE SET AT RUN TIME IT ALSO HAS ACCESS TO SOME SHORT CUT KEYS LIKE CTRL+X ,CTRL+C etc
 
Thomas Paul
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This is incorrect. Although Swing does use the AWT for the event model and some other features, most Swing objects are lightweight and have no native code associated with them. They do not use the underlying OS for painting themselves. They use their own paint methods and paint themselves without using native OS code. Swing does not sit on top of AWT. It sits along side of AWT with some overlapping.
Note: Sme Swing objects are heavyweight. They are: JWindow, JDialog, JApplet, and JFrame. All other Swing objects are lightweight.
 
vishal sodani
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Thanks for reply.But if I want to be a java developer do I have to know swings in detail?
 
Thomas Paul
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It depends. If you want to develop applets or applications using Swing, then yes you need to know Swing. If you want to develop servlets and JSPs then no you don't need Swing.
 
Frank Hale
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If you want to develop very professional looking applets or applications then you should definitely learn Swing. In my opinion Swing is one of the best looking toolkits around and I simply love its style. To see what Swing is capable of just look at the Jext text editor www.jext.org . Swing has alot going for it and is very rich in functionality. Sure there are memory issues but Swing is going to be a deciding factor in making Java stick on the client side.
Just my opinions,
Frank
 
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