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J2EE Experience Question

 
Greenhorn
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Hello all,

I've been programming for the past 14 odd years in many different areas. I've worked in both the Microsoft and Sun arenas but the majority of "work" experience has been in the Microsoft world. But, I've also worked in the Java world by maintaining a commercial site for my own business.

Recently I've decided to move to a location that has more of a Java presence and frankly, I'm more interested in working in Java. Here's the question.. what constitutes real j2ee experience? I have a lot of experience in JSP and servlets, which is the Web Tier of the j2ee, but little experience using EJB or other aspects of the j2ee package.

Thanks
Dave
 
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Well, I'm not sure exactly what the questions is, but I'm surmising that you are wondering how necessary EJB and its ilk is in the workplace?

You'll get many different viewpoints, I'm sure, but in the decade that I've been working in Java web applications, I've never worked in an organization that used EJB. So I think you can get along quite well with just Servlets and JSP.

That said, EJB and the other J2EE stack technologies never hurt to be on your resume. I'm not saying that you shouldn't get involved in these technologies, just that it's not a given that they're used in any random Java web app shop.
 
Dave Berkheimer
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Bear,

Thanks for the quick reply and confirming what I thought to be true. Now how about doing me a favor and calling some of the headhunters that I've been working with and telling them that they're full of it.

Thanks
Dave
 
Bear Bibeault
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In general, head hunters deal with keywords not people. The more keywords, the more possibilities they have to place you and get a fat check.

Many companies are guilty of this as well. They're looking to hire keywords, not people. Finding companies with the smarts to realize that developers are not a commodity can be challenging.
 
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I have a lot of experience in JSP and servlets, which is the Web Tier of the j2ee, but little experience using EJB or other aspects of the j2ee package.



Working with Java Server Pages and Java servlets is Java 2 Enterprise Edition experience. There are also many other API that also are part of the older J2EE platform, e.g. JAXB, JMS, JMX, JDBC, EJB, JAXP, SAX, JAX-RPC, etc. Any work with these API are also J2EE experience.

Java EE has many more Java-based API that are part of the Enterprise Edition, e.g. StAX, JAX-WS, JCA, JTA, JSF, etc.

If one's Java work consists of only JSP and servlets, it may be perceived as being kinda light. It has been a while for me, but JMS and SOAP, SAAJ, JAX-RPC web services are in demand.
 
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