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Need help for apply java job

 
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hello all: I recently pass SCWCD with very good mark, and I aslo hold a degree from very good University a few years ago, the only problem is my work experience is out of date, fro I am working in other area. I am in Australia.

Anyone can give practical advise and help on this. Please give me message, Thanks advance.
 
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While looking for work

-- Get your resume into good shape.

-- contribute to open-source projects. try to use the sought-after technologies.

-- Do some tutorials.

-- Also try for a volunteer work if you are finding it hard.


good luck.
[ September 30, 2008: Message edited by: arulk pillai ]
 
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-- contribute to open-source projects. try to use the sought-after technologies.



I am wondering why this get recommended so much. You can't just come in and change code. You may have to submit changes (bug fixes) via forum for months -- with someone else doing the actual work before getting on the radar (meaning being trusted as one who know the code)

Once you are trusted, it can take years before you are truely trusted -- meaning can make changes to the code directly.

I can't see how this can be useful to someone in-between jobs...

Henry
[ October 01, 2008: Message edited by: Henry Wong ]
 
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Originally posted by Henry Wong:
I can't see how this can be useful to someone in-between jobs..


Maybe for something to talk about at the interview? Even if it is just about fixing bugs by e-mail, it's a type of experience.

Incidentally, I wasn't between jobs, but I got my name on the internet for a contribution to a small open source library. It's listed as "Added support for JUnit 3.8 style tests. Thanks to Jeanne Boyarsky for suggesting the feature and providing implementation hints." and "Added support for JUnit 4.4.1. Thanks to Jeanne Boyarsky for providing the code fix. " I had never worked on the library and just e-mailed in my code fix and unit test. I didn't contribute for the entry in the release notes though. I did it because I wanted the library to contain these two features.
 
arulk pillai
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I am wondering why this get recommended so much.



-- You can learn from and enhance your coding skills by looking at others� code.
-- You can get feedback from others on your code.
-- You can enhance your ability to understand problems and develop effective solutions for it.
-- You can proudly mention your contribution on your resume.

Henry, you have a point there. It is a bit tougher for the beginners. There are so many open-source projects and you can get involved at different levels (Add documentation, find bugs, fix bugs, add new features, write sample applications, etc). Some are less popular than the others.

[ October 01, 2008: Message edited by: arulk pillai ]
[ October 01, 2008: Message edited by: arulk pillai ]
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Arulk,
The first three of those help you learn and become a better programmer. I don't see how they help you get a job either. At least not more than any other way of improving yourself professionally would.
 
arulk pillai
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The first three of those help you learn and become a better programmer. I don't see how they help you get a job either. At least not more than any other way of improving yourself professionally would.




-- Commitment: It can display genuine intent in the choice of your career in Java/JEE. Some companies spend a lot of money and time on training beginners. So, you need to show the company that you won�t move on too soon and also that you have made the right career choice.

-- Some level of hands on experience will boost your confidence, especially in interviews.

-- Many open-source projects use some of the sought-after technologies/frameworks/tools Spring, Hibernate, Junit, Log4J, Maven2, etc. By looking at the code and contributing one can get some level of familiarity, at least the big picture.

-- There could be many other candidates with similar qualifications and Java certifications like you. So you need to have something extra to stand out from the rest. Contribution to open-source is not the only thing. You can draw on your transferable skills gained through other part-time, full-time or volunteer work. The main purpose is to emphasize your non-technical skills like interpersonal skills, analytical skills, problem solving skills, leadership skills, adaptability, and ability to learn things quickly and be a self-starter. So, you should point out these skills acquired via other activities like part-time or casual employment, public speaking, tutoring, raising funds for charities, contributing to news letters, laying out copy for a year book, scouting, etc.
[ October 02, 2008: Message edited by: arulk pillai ]
 
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