Win a copy of Functional Reactive Programming this week in the Other Languages forum!
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

java servlets support JSP?????

 
Ronnie Phelps
Ranch Hand
Posts: 329
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm interested in learning more about java servlets and Jsp. Right now I'm searching for a web host. I noticed that alot of the web host say they support Java Servlets but they don't say anything about JSP. Can I assume that I will be able to implement Java server pages using a web host that says it supports java servlets?
 
Tony Alicea
Desperado
Sheriff
Posts: 3226
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Most likely but... don't they have a contact e-mail address where you can ask?
 
Jeff Tveita
Greenhorn
Posts: 11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If someone supports servlets then they almost cetainly would have to support JSP's. JSP's are essentially servlet code written within the html, which is then compiled at runtime. Take a look at www.ejip.net. (I'm a partial to ejip.net because I work for them)
 
Tony Alicea
Desperado
Sheriff
Posts: 3226
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Can I get a discount on your fees for another non-profit group based in Spain?
 
Frank Carver
Sheriff
Posts: 6920
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would dispute the suggestion that supporting servlets implies supporting JSP. A lot of ISPs who support servlets, do so using the Apace JServ plugin for the very popular Apache Webserver. Unfortunately, although still supported, this is old-fashioned software and has been superseded by more modern servlet containers such as Tomcat, Resin, JRun etc. JServ only supports version 2.0 of the Servlet API, and does not easily support JSP.
It is vital that you check with a potential ISP which servlet container (aka "servlet engine") they use, and which version of it. If they can't tell you that immediately, don't use them - they don't understand enough about server-side Java to offer sensible support. When they have told you, don't rely on the overconfident ISP marketing to tell you what it can do. Look up the capabilities of the container on the web to find out what it can really do.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic