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xml-rpc and servlets  RSS feed

 
roger jours
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Hi,
This is my first posting to this forum - I hope I get the protocols right! To the chase...
Is it possible to run an xml-rpc *server* as a servlet?
I'm building a virtual queue manager for requests to build-servers. I want to use tomcat as the overall startup/management framework for my server as it boots up the rest of the applications in this suite. Also, there is a web display element involved: I'd like to see the status of all the queues displayed on an HTML page.
So, I think I've got good reasons for using Tomcat and xml-rpc in such an unusual format. Has anyone else done something similar?
TIA
roger
 
Balaji Loganathan
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Did u had a look into this project ? http://ws.apache.org/xmlrpc/server.html
 
roger jours
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Originally posted by Balaji Loganathan:
Did u had a look into this project ? http://ws.apache.org/xmlrpc/server.html

Yes. I'm using the apache software for the xml-rpc calls. My queue manager wants to be a blocking server - i.e. use the full WebServer class but listening on a different port to that of the tomcat server - and dole-out tasks which use a persistent datastructure that models the server queues. This persistent structure would last the life-time of the server. So the scenario I think I want is that tomcat launches the queue manager servlet on start-up, and then the q-manager then handles requests on a different port?
Is it possible to fit the WebServer class into the Tomcat Framework? Do people routinely run servlets like this? Can I fit a few JSP pages into this scenario?
cheers,
roger.
 
Balaji Loganathan
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Sorry I don't know the answer.
 
William Brogden
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Having the queue manager listening on a different port while still part of the server doesn't sound right to me. Maybe I don't understand how you want the requests to this system handled. Could you outline how the data flow is supposed to go?
Why not just run it as a separate application and have servlets talk to it. That would be easier to debug, seems to me.
Bill
 
roger jours
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Originally posted by William Brogden:
Having the queue manager listening on a different port while still part of the server doesn't sound right to me. Maybe I don't understand how you want the requests to this system handled. Could you outline how the data flow is supposed to go?
Why not just run it as a separate application and have servlets talk to it. That would be easier to debug, seems to me.
Bill

The queue manager receives requests from the scheduler. The queue manager puts requests on the queue designated to the build-server, one queue for each build-server (about 15 build-servers). A consumer thread (one for each build-server) then takes the request off it's queue and pushes it to the build-server.
I guess that this architecture doesn't mesh well with servlet architecture - the queue structure (and the queue threads) has(have) to be maintained across subsequent server-requests. Which I think can't be done with servlets - my knowledge of servlets is very lacking.
roger.
 
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