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Next time your starving try these out.
 
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i'm suprised they did not list "baloute" (i do not know how to spell it). it is a delicacy in thailand... basically, it is a raw egg that is about 1/3 of the way into the hatching stage. yep, an occasional feather, beak or other solid body part can be found in the egg... if you are lucky.
 
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"baloute" is popular in the Philipines, also, except they boil it and it is usually served with salt. It comes in a various stages of development, depending on your preference. The wierdest part is that street vendors sell it! "I'll have two hotdogs, a pretzel and a partially developed duck egg." eeeeeewwwwwww!

[This message has been edited by Ray Marsh (edited June 02, 2001).]
 
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In the Philippines, it's spelled "balut". They're duck eggs and they are "harvested" when they are 16-18 days into incubation. They aren't crunchy or anything at that point, maybe a few pin feathers but you basically just suck it down and swallow it whole. And they are cooked and sold piping hot. They are actually very tasty and I know a lot of Americans/Westerners who like it a lot after they get over the initial reaction to eating an embryo. The juices are the best part really, not the embryo. Eat it with a pinch of salt. Goes well with a beer or two... mmmm "balut"... High in cholesterol though. Rumored to be an aphrodisiac although it doesn't make your breath smell very good
For the less adventurous, there is the "penoy" which is about 12 to 14 days and doesn't have the embryo yet.
Junilu

[This message has been edited by JUNILU LACAR (edited June 02, 2001).]
 
Andy Ceponis
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That is just wrong. There are some things ppl just should not eat, and thats one of them.
 
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So we should wait until it is a full grown bird, and THEN eat it? How is that intrinsically better?
 
Greg Harris
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Originally posted by JUNILU LACAR:
Goes well with a beer or two... mmmm "balut"...B]


from what i observed in thailand and the phillipines, it usually only went [B]AFTER
a beer or six... the street vendors would be out there at 12 or 1:00 in the morning making a fortune off all of us drunken Sailors and Marines! unfortunately, that is one local custom i was not able to experience.
 
Junilu Lacar
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Originally posted by Andy Ceponis:
That is just wrong. There are some things ppl just should not eat, and thats one of them.


Food is food is food... Could be worse: how about live baby octopus? Saw it on TV once. Apparently, they are considered quite a treat in Korea, kids and adults alike seemed to enjoy eating them. I wouldn't mind trying that out if I ever get the chance. There are some things I won't eat unless forced to at gunpoint or dire circumstance.
Junilu
 
Junilu Lacar
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Originally posted by Greg Harris:
it usually only went AFTER a beer or six... the street vendors would be out there at 12 or 1:00 in the morning making a fortune off all of us drunken Sailors and Marines! unfortunately, that is one local custom i was not able to experience.


Too bad. You might be able to find some "balut" there in Marietta. I hear there's a pretty big Filipino community out there. If you're ever in New York City, there are some places in Chinatown that sell them. I make it a point to get a few every time I go.
Did any of your buddies ever try this one on those balut vendors?
"How much are the balut?"
"Good ones are 5 pesos, cracked ones are 3 pesos"
"OK, here's 6, crack a couple for me."
Junilu
 
Ray Marsh
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Can't be much worse than raw oysters.
I guess if you have enough salt and/or beer, anything is palatable!
Raw meat is out for me... no Sushi, no thank you.
How about tripe? There's a good old fashioned dish to put hair on your teeth! eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeewwwwwwwwwww!
I'll stick to meat and potatoes, thank you very much.
 
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