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how often do you...

 
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upgrade your computer? i built one last year (october) and the prices have come down so far (as the speeds have gone up) that i am tempted to upgrade my processor... but then i would have to buy a new motherboard as well.
i currently have an AMD-athlon 850Mhz with 384 Meg RAM... it is a Slot-A, but it looks like most of the new processors are Socket-A.
does anyone know if the Socket-A processors run cooler than Slot-A? my Slot-A athlon has been giving me overheating problems for a while now and i think it is about to start crashing.
 
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Socket A setups run alot hotter. You need better cooling and more of it.
I just put together a 1.2 ghz Athlon Thunderbird system. It needs alot more cooling than my old Athlon 750 slotA ever did.
 
Andy Ceponis
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I usually upgrade my whole system when a cool new part comes out like a mobo with a new chipset or a new video card series(like the GeForce3 which i just got).
 
Greg Harris
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well that sucks... remember my overheating problems from a few months ago? they are back! 155f consistently now.
i might go ahead and upgrade anyway... i can use the old mobo and processor for my linux box.
 
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I do minor upgrades as the piece are affordable / needed. Like memory or CPU/motherboard. But I go for a while new system every 4 to 5 years.

 
Andy Ceponis
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Greg running 155f on a tbird will fry it. You will have to get better cooling than what you have now. Lemme know if you want/need some help/info.
 
Greg Harris
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yea, Andy, i would appreciate some tips! i have a large tower running 6 fans... 2 of the fans are a combo with the heatsink, so i guess it is really 5 fans.
i have an intake in the front on bottom
exhausts: 1 on the powersupply, 1 in back on top and 1 on the bottom.
and 2 fans on the cpu/heatsink,
i know 1 intake is not enough for all the exhausts, so i have experimented with making the back-top an intake so it will run down and over the cpu... doesn't seem to do any good.
i tried the thermal paste thing and that reduced the temp for a while (135f) but it is back up again. the heatsink does not attach well with my cpu so i am sure that it is not doing as much as it can... it seems that the Socket-A would be easier to put with the heatsink.
i think i might wait another month or 2 before i buy anything, but any hints/tips/suggestions are more than welcome! i.e. how are you cooling your 1.2 ghz tbird and what temp are you running at?
thanks a gig!
[This message has been edited by Greg Harris (edited August 16, 2001).]
 
Andy Ceponis
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Greg,
Ok, so basically you have only 3 fans. The 2 on your heatsink dont count for case cooling. And the powersupply does not count either since it generates its own heat and therefore cant expell much of the case generated heat.
First off you need to try and take care of the processor problem. If you are running 155f that is 68c. Now it is acceptable to run at that temp, but that is for sure on the WAY HIGH side of what it should be. Generally it is good to run around 50c(that would be 122f). If your heatsink is not making good contact with the cpu then that is most likely the cause of your heat problems. You need to be sure that there is a VERY good bond between the cpu and the heatsink.And make sure only to use enough thermal paste so that the microscopic holes in the heatsink get filled with the paste and not much more. More is not better when it comes to thermal paste.
I would suggest you take the heatsink off and clean it with some alcohol. Get all the old paste off, and reapply it. Make sure there is a good seal.
Now if you really want to get into cooling, you can start by rearranging your fans. As you know heat rises. So there is no need for an exhaust fan to be at the bottom of your case, especially if its a full tower. A very popular method is to put a fan on the top of your case acting as a blowhole. This is where all the heat gathers and its an ideal spot for a large fan.
If your not into cutting new holes for fans then you can add another exhaust fan at the top of the case. Change the bottom fan to an intake fan. You can also add a fan inside the case just to redirect the airflow. So if you have 2 intake fans at the bottom, then you could put a fan in the middle of the case pointing upwards towards your cpu/pci card/chipset area. This will help the cool air get to its destination. It will also make the hot air rise so it can exit the exhaust holes.
My 1.2 tbird runs at 46c/115f. And thats with a slower speed fan. The fan that i originally got for the heatsink was a tad load for the part of the room i was using it in. That fan kept temps down to 38c/100f. It was noisier but did the job very well.
I am building another system right now with a 1.4 tbird that im going to overclock. I have an even bigger heatsink/fan combo ready for it, and even with the extra voltage im gonna give the cpu it will still stay well under 50c/122f.
Anything else you need to know? Please ask..
 
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we just upgraded ours last year to the tune of $700 and the bloody thing still doesn't work very well
we have to buy a new cd rom soon, we seem to go through them fairly quickly for some reason, we're on our third.
 
Andy Ceponis
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Sandra,
What does the system do to not work very well?
 
Greg Harris
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andy,
thanks for the tips... i was on the road taking panoramic shots for the website all day so i just checked this. i will play around with the new fan configuration tonight and see what happens.
i think i put just about the right amount of paste on the heatsink, but i can always start over.
thanks again!
 
Andy Ceponis
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Anytime, and lemme know how it turns out. Or if you need any more help. Always glad to help a fellow techie.
 
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