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String and internationalization

 
Cherry Mathew
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Hi
Does java.lang.String support internationalization fully. Which all functions doesnt support?
what are the issues i need to take care of when using string?
is it a good idea to use a wrapper for String class for internationalization.
Cherry
 
Wilfried LAURENT
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What do you mean by "Does String support FULLY internationalization"?
Internationalization is supported through the use of ResourceBundles (see the tutorial on the site of Sun, or the javadoc). Depending on how your Locale is set, you will get Ja, Yes, Oui, Da ... on a call.
W.
[This message has been edited by Wilfried LAURENT (edited October 16, 2001).]
[This message has been edited by Wilfried LAURENT (edited October 16, 2001).]
 
Cherry Mathew
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By full support i asked abt the frunctions of String class
Thanx for the reply
Cherry
 
Wilfried LAURENT
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There is no method in the String class supporting internationalization, if you give to "internationalization" the standard meaning. Can you give an example or develop your idea?
W.
 
Cherry Mathew
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What if im passing a japaneese string to the compareTo function 2) using String tokenizer
etc
Thanx
regards
Cherry
 
Valentin Crettaz
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The following ideas come from the following book:
Java Internationalization (O'Reilly March 2001) by Andrew Deitsch & David Czarnecky
You should not use the compareTo and equals method of the String class to compare "international" strings. Instead you should use the abstract class java.text.Collator.
First get an instance of the collator (here an instance of a collator for a french locale)

Then, use either collator.compare() or collator.equals() to compare two strings. Both methods take the two strings arguments and return an integer...
HIH

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Valentin Crettaz
Sun Certified Programmer for Java 2 Platform
 
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