Win a copy of Java Challengers this week in the Java in General forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other Pie Elite all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Paul Clapham
  • Ron McLeod
  • paul wheaton
  • Devaka Cooray
Sheriffs:
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Tim Cooke
  • Liutauras Vilda
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Moores
  • Tim Holloway
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Carey Brown
  • Piet Souris
Bartenders:
  • salvin francis
  • Mikalai Zaikin
  • Himai Minh

what is threads and jbeans

 
Greenhorn
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
what is threads and java beans how we use
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 152
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Threads are "flows of control" or "flows of
execution" where your program seems to "do
more than one thing at a time." (Unless you
run the program on a computer with more than
one CPU, it really only does one thing at a
time. Very quickly, but one at a time.)
There are several good Java books for learning
about threads and multi-threaded programming.
I like one by Doug Lea, called
"Concurrent Programming in Java, 2nd Edition"
It has a lot of very good information.
Beans are either
Java Beans, a type of Java class which is
"self contained" to make it easy to use in several
types of tools, or
Enterprise Java Beans (EJBs), one of the topics
which is appropriate for this forum. They are
also special classes which are "self contained"
but for use in several different server products,
commercial and freeware.
A good book for learning about them might be the
one that Java Ranch is giving away this week,
"Professional Java Server Programming J2EE,
1.3 Edition." The publisher notes at Amazon.com
say
"This book is for professional Java developers
who want to employ Java as the platform for their
distributed, enterprise applications. It provides
a comprehensive guide to the J2EE APIs implemented
by J2EE-licensed application servers.
No knowledge of J2EE technologies is assumed...."

How you use these things depends almost entirely
on what you're trying to do. If you're trying to
learn about them, get some open source products
like Tomcat (jakarta.apache.org) and/or
JBoss (www.jboss.org) and begin with the examples,
then experiment.
Joe
 
mister krabs
Posts: 13974
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This has nothing to do with J2EE so I am moving it to Java in General (Intermediate).
------------------
Tom
Sun Certified Programmer for the Java� 2 Platform
Moderator of the forums:
J2EE and EJB
Other Java APIs
 
High Plains Drifter
Posts: 7289
Netbeans IDE VI Editor
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Zeeshan -
Here's a good starting point for learning about the JavaBeans specification.
------------------
Michael Ernest, co-author of: The Complete Java 2 Certification Study Guide
[This message has been edited by Michael Ernest (edited December 07, 2001).]
 
Is that a spider in your hair? Here, threaten it with this tiny ad:
Thread Boost feature
https://coderanch.com/t/674455/Thread-Boost-feature
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic