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Colorblind?

 
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I understand this condition is found in male humans, but (almost) never in females.
Why, do you think?
G.
 
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dont know but i wish condition didnt exist. it is the reason my teacher gives for making me use windows system colors for my homework projects. i would get marked down for not sticking to gray and black
 
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Originally posted by Guy Allard:
I understand this condition is found in male humans, but (almost) never in females.
Why, do you think?
G.


I thought it was basic genetics... the main type of color-blindness was found to be a linked to the X chromosome... a guy only has one... so if the one he has, also has that color-blind gene -- he's color blind.
For a woman to be color blind, both her X chromosomes have to have the color-blind gene -- meaning both her father has to have it and her mother has to be a carrier. (less likely)
Here's something I found off google.
[ April 24, 2002: Message edited by: Jessica Sant ]
 
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it is called evolution. Over time, males couldn't care less about the colours of their clothes, furniture, etc. so over time we've lost this ability to distinguish between colours ( or we just don't care! ). Amazingly enough, we have increased the sensitivity to our sense of feel. This could be due to the fact that we make choices of our clothes, furniture, etc. based on comfort levels!
 
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I thought we made decisions on what to wear based on if it smelled clean or not... and even then it's only if we're going to be in public for long.
 
Jamie Robertson
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I think I could look past the smell if it was comfortable enough. I may change them if there was public out cry on the smell though.
 
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Actually, less than one-half of one percent of women are color blind. Although I really like the criteria for matching clothes . . .
 
Jamie Robertson
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Originally posted by Dorothy Finkel-Laverty:
Actually, less than one-half of one percent of women are color blind. Although I really like the criteria for matching clothes . . .

...and 8% or 1 in 12 males are colour deficient ( usually red - green deficient )
Jamie
 
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