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DubyaMan .. do you all know abt him :D

 
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one of Dubyaman act
DubyaMan is simply great
[ May 22, 2002: Message edited by: Ravish Kumar ]
 
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It?s pretty basic and almost stupid from a kind of a daily like Times Of India. That was my first impression.
But, now here I am, just finished reading all of the strips from the whole archive, and hey, it?s not bad. Especially, because he is not really taking any sides. (Well, or is that I am biased what makes me write this?)
Ashok.
PS: I am confident that our other Ranchers in here will take it lightly. It?s just for a .
 
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You obviously haven't been following The Mighty Vajpayee. I lost the link or I would pass it on to you. My favorite episode is where The Mighty Vajpayee bravely rescues 155 airline passengers being held by terrorists by releasing three other terrorists, some of whom then go on to help finance the murder of thousands of others, as well as murder and decapitate a reporter.
You guys should check it out, I'm sure you would find it amusing. I am confident you would take it lightly.
[ May 22, 2002: Message edited by: Jason Menard ]
 
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ouch...
 
Maky
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From the times of india.. Make no mistake. The Times of India's Dubyaman - George W Bush as a costumed superhero - has become an international brand leader. The caped crusader, who first soared out of the pages of The Times of India shortly after 9/11, has sparked off a number of wannabe clones in publications as diverse as The Economist, Guardian and cult American humour magazine, Mad.

The latest Economist shows a gathering of American superheroes, including Batman and Spiderman, in which Superman bears an uncanny resemblance to the current US president. The Guardian, too, had lampooned the war in Afghanistan by depicting Bush in superhero garb. And a recent cover of German magazine Der Spiegel showed Bush as Rambo, flanked by defence secretary Donald Rumsfeld as Conan the Barbarian and Vice-President Dick Cheney as Mad Max. Secretary of state Colin Powell and National Security Adviser Condoleeza Rice lurk in the background as Batman and Red Sonja, respectively.


[ May 23, 2002: Message edited by: Maky ]
 
Jason Menard
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Originally posted by Maky:
From the times of india.. Make no mistake. The Times of India's Dubyaman - George W Bush as a costumed superhero - has become an international brand leader.


Make no mistake, "Dubyaman" is a load of anti-American tripe, IMHO. Maybe I just have no sense of humor.
But humor is a funny thing... It is perfectly acceptable for any particular nationality/race/religion to laugh at and lampoon themselves for the most part, but at the same time not acceptable from another nationality/race/religion. When the latter occurs, it is then that labels beginning with anti- or ending in -ist or -ism are more likely appropriate.
As for Jug Suraiya's pointless and self-serving essay Laughter in the Time of Conflict, which he writes in a poor attempt to justify himself, he just doesn't get it.
He makes the following statement:

Such examples of macabre humour are relevant today as America once again tries to learn to live with tragedy and violent death.


Maybe I am not aware of something in his background, but what makes him qualified to state what type of humour we should find relevant or acceptable, particularly from a non-American source?
Suraiya betrays his sympathies when he writes (emphasis is mine):

Like ethnic jokes, �sick� humour is deplored as being �politically incorrect�. This is to understate the case.
�Sick� jokes are meant to illustrate the incorrectness of the politics that have brought you to the grief from which you now seek deliverance. The more incorrect the politics, the blacker the corrective humour.


The 9/11 humor that did spring up soon after the event, that seems to be more in line with the general American public's line of thinking post-9/11 (of course I can't speak for everyone, I'm just generalizing), is a far cry from Suraiya's irrelevant politics. I would suggest a look at Bressler.org. One of my particular favorites is this one (warning, very R-rated), but I have an often twisted sense of humor anyway.
[ May 23, 2002: Message edited by: Jason Menard ]

 
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And this seems a good time to close this particular thread, as the basic points seem to have been made in a reasonably civil manner, but we can well imagine how this will grow, based on past threads. Cheers...
[ May 23, 2002: Message edited by: Jim Yingst ]
 
And inside of my fortune cookie was this tiny ad:
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