This week's book giveaways are in the Angular and TypeScript and Web Services forums.
We're giving away four copies each of Programming with Types and The Design of Web APIs and have the authors on-line!
See this thread and this one for details.
Win a copy of Programming with Types this week in the Angular and TypeScript forum
or The Design of Web APIs in the Web Services forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Bear Bibeault
  • Paul Clapham
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
Sheriffs:
  • Junilu Lacar
  • Knute Snortum
  • Henry Wong
Saloon Keepers:
  • Ron McLeod
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Frits Walraven
  • Joe Ess
  • salvin francis

Time travel causes jet lag

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 583
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi!
If you fly across time zones.. you are infact travelling against/past time are you not??
Wud that mean that flying across timezones is what Einstien claimed impossible?? is that what we do to feel a "jet lag"??
What say pardners??
Regds
Gautham Kasinath
 
Leverager of our synergies
Posts: 10065
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I flied "against time zones", funny feeling. You take a plane at 11.00 and land at 11.00 of the same day in the opposite side of the globe
Wud that mean that flying across timezones is what Einstien claimed impossible??
Hm... I suppose Einstein was smart enough to foresee such a possibility....
is that what we do to feel a "jet lag"??
"Being worn out and tired for days after arriving, generally accompanied by a lack of concentration and motivation, especially for any activity that requires effort or skill, such as driving, reading or discussing a business deal."
There is a strange thing I do not have explanations for. When I flied from the USA to Russia, I couldn't adjust for a switch between day and night for quite a long time. The opposite traveling (twice) never took me more than a day to adjust. How can it be?
[ May 30, 2002: Message edited by: Mapraputa Is ]
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 919
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There is a strange thing I do not have explanations for. When I flew from the USA to Russia, I couldn't adjust for a switch between day and night for quite a long time. The opposite traveling (twice) never took me more than a day to adjust. How can it be?
Maybe it was because you were just so happy to be back with Mother Russia that you didn't notice the jetlag...
I always find it upsets my sleep patterns, whether I fly west to east or east to west. Flying from London to Malaysia (GMT+8) in May took me over a week to adjust, but I think east to west will also be difficult (it's been 10 years since I flew an 8 hour difference and I don't remember how easy or difficult it was back then). I'll tell you how the return journey went in July.
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1936
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I agree with Map aboutt he the 'Flying East' problem. (And I think George got it wrong )
The -5.5 hr difference of Bombay to London is not really a problem to cope up with, and I hardly feel any JetLag as such. But everytime I travel the other way, it takes my at least 3 days to get used to the new sleep, appetite patterns.
I wonder why? :roll:
Ashok.
PS: Just Found this explanation on net. Fly East for Bad Jet Lag
 
mister krabs
Posts: 13974
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
When I flew from New York to London I was a wreck for a couple of days. But it was an overnight flight that I didn't sleep on and I arrived in the morning London time. Coming back I had no problems.
 
Bartender
Posts: 2205
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
When I get on a plane, I set my watch to the timezone where I will be landing, then just mentally "adopt" that time, period. If it's suddenly 3am, I'm supposed to be asleep, so I will try. Usually that doesn't work, but I go through the motions. When it's 9am, etc, I "wake up" and start the day.
Usually what happens is that there is a period of one day in which I may not sleep for 24 hours, after that, I sleep a normal 8, then I'm ready to go. I never try to think "what time is it where I came from", I just live in the timezone I am in.
For whatever reason, this has always worked for me and I'm never jetlagged for more than one day.
 
Sheriff
Posts: 6450
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In my experience, to overcome jetlag, it is best once you reach your destination to try to stay awake until, according to your destination's local time, it would normally be time for you to sleep.
But if I may quote Ford Prefect:
"Time is an illusion. Lunchtime, doubly so."
 
Wanderer
Posts: 18671
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you fly across time zones.. you are infact travelling against/past time are you not??
Wud that mean that flying across timezones is what Einstien claimed impossible??

Don't be silly. Time zones are just social conventions which a physicist would ignore as irrelevant.
As for the east/west thing. Googling "jet lag east west" gives a number of articles about this. Apparently it's generally accepted (from various studies) that traveling east is tougher for most people than traveling west. When you travel west, you lengthen your day, while traveling east, you shorten it. Generally it's easier to force yourself to stay awake longer than usual, than it is to force yourself to go to sleep sooner than usual. In the former case you may feel rotten for the remainder of the day, but once you got to bed, you'll probably sleep soundly, and be normal the next day. In the latter case though, you'll often get insomnia, or an unsatisfying sleep, which will continue to affect you throughout the next day. If you're allowed to sleep in to compensate, you're just putting your problems off to the next night. Likewise you may be tempted to nap during the day - again, it'll just make it harder to get to sleep that night. This pattern can go on indefinitely if you don't break it at some point.
Also, there are evidently studies showing that human circadian rhythms naturally tend a bit longer than 24 hours, in the absence of stimuli. (Translation - some poor schmucks who volunteered as test subjects were kept indoors away from sunlight for weeks at a time, and allowed to turn off the lights to sleep whenever it seemed right to them.) So this is further support for the idea that long days are easier than short ones.
 
It's hard to fight evil. The little things, like a nice sandwich, really helps. Right tiny ad?
Java file APIs (DOC, XLS, PDF, and many more)
https://products.aspose.com/total/java
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!